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  string(19) "2016-03-07 14:56:45"
  ["post_date_gmt"]=>
  string(19) "2016-03-07 04:56:45"
  ["post_content"]=>
  string(4792) "A good job description can be your best friend. A bad one can be the very thing that tips you over the edge. When you decide the time is right for whatever reason to recruit a new team member, you will (I hope) ask yourself several important questions.

Among these, will be questions around the function/s of the role itself. If you can’t answer them, or don’t take the time to, the domino effect could cause you real – and potentially expensive problems.

The purpose of a job description is to provide a detailed insight into a particular role, with the objective of finding the right person for the job. If you have ever taken the hit for hiring the wrong individual, you will be all too aware of the financial and practical implications. Spare a thought too for the person you hired. Neither side of the coin is a winner.

So how can you make sure your job description will steer both you and prospective candidates in the right direction?

1. What’s in a name?

Quite a bit really. Think about it, is your title important to you? Probably. Job titles are more varied these days than ever before, some even verging on the ridiculous.

The important thing is that the title attracts the correct calibre of candidate in terms of experience, knowledge and salary bracket.

2. What do you do?

What will this person actually do day to day? Employers I implore you – take this seriously. Think carefully about the needs of your business and why this position has become available.

Too often, I hear candidates tell me their war stories of the roles that were sold to them as something else entirely. The receptionists who end up acting as senior EA’s minus the salary bump, the accountants who weren’t told about the accounts payable backlog, the list goes on.

People don’t mind stepping outside of their core functions occasionally to support others, but you wouldn’t buy a Ferrari if you knew the interior came out of a second hand hatchback.

3. Who are you?

If I had a dollar for the amount of times I hear the word culture every day, I would be on a private beach somewhere on a deck chair made of solid gold. (I’m exaggerating, but you get my point). You cannot teach someone to fit in, and culture fit is paramount.

For existing employees, they will want someone they can work with, relate to and, quite frankly, like. For the potential new hire, they want to join somewhere welcoming, collaborative and aligned with their values.

Be honest in your representation of your culture in the job description. Talk about the qualities that are genuinely important to your team, and think about the company you want to be. You don’t have to give a warts and all rundown of everyone, but if you lie – you’ll get found out pretty quickly.

4. How much?

Know your market. You need to have an understanding of the current candidate market and their expectations. Look at salary surveys and speak to people in similar roles. If you underpay, they will be a ticking time bomb. If you overpay, they will have unrealistic expectations if they move on in the future – and you might have some disgruntled current employees if word gets out.

Remember, you get what you pay for, so make sure your offering is in line with your requirements.

5. Deal breakers

Degrees, industry experience, systems, typing speed, visas… Are they deal breakers for you? Let us know. If you have an unwavering condition that must be met, save yourself and candidates the headache of going through the recruitment process, only to fall at a technical hurdle that went unmentioned.

I cannot promise you that all candidates will read every word of a job description (you could type “Excel” in flashing neon yellow and some people won’t notice), but make sure your JD supports you when people ask why they were not considered.

A strong job description should be accurate, attractive - to the right people – and paint an honest picture. I would love to hear people’s feedback/stories on this, or any good tips you have to create a great JD. Please feel free leave a comment below."
  ["post_title"]=>
  string(47) "5 Steps to Crafting The Perfect Job Description"
  ["post_excerpt"]=>
  string(113) "A strong job description should be accurate, attractive – to the right people – and paint an honest picture. "
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http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/what-is-the-real-cost-of-recruiting-the-wrong-person/"
  ["post_modified"]=>
  string(19) "2016-05-23 08:54:06"
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A good job description can be your best friend. A bad one can be the very thing that tips you over the edge. When you decide the time is right for whatever reason to recruit a new team member, you will (I hope) ask yourself several important questions.

Among these, will be questions around the function/s of the role itself. If you can’t answer them, or don’t take the time to, the domino effect could cause you real – and potentially expensive problems.

The purpose of a job description is to provide a detailed insight into a particular role, with the objective of finding the right person for the job. If you have ever taken the hit for hiring the wrong individual, you will be all too aware of the financial and practical implications. Spare a thought too for the person you hired. Neither side of the coin is a winner.

So how can you make sure your job description will steer both you and prospective candidates in the right direction?

1. What’s in a name?

Quite a bit really. Think about it, is your title important to you? Probably. Job titles are more varied these days than ever before, some even verging on the ridiculous.

The important thing is that the title attracts the correct calibre of candidate in terms of experience, knowledge and salary bracket.

2. What do you do?

What will this person actually do day to day? Employers I implore you – take this seriously. Think carefully about the needs of your business and why this position has become available.

Too often, I hear candidates tell me their war stories of the roles that were sold to them as something else entirely. The receptionists who end up acting as senior EA’s minus the salary bump, the accountants who weren’t told about the accounts payable backlog, the list goes on.

People don’t mind stepping outside of their core functions occasionally to support others, but you wouldn’t buy a Ferrari if you knew the interior came out of a second hand hatchback.

3. Who are you?

If I had a dollar for the amount of times I hear the word culture every day, I would be on a private beach somewhere on a deck chair made of solid gold. (I’m exaggerating, but you get my point). You cannot teach someone to fit in, and culture fit is paramount.

For existing employees, they will want someone they can work with, relate to and, quite frankly, like. For the potential new hire, they want to join somewhere welcoming, collaborative and aligned with their values.

Be honest in your representation of your culture in the job description. Talk about the qualities that are genuinely important to your team, and think about the company you want to be. You don’t have to give a warts and all rundown of everyone, but if you lie – you’ll get found out pretty quickly.

4. How much?

Know your market. You need to have an understanding of the current candidate market and their expectations. Look at salary surveys and speak to people in similar roles. If you underpay, they will be a ticking time bomb. If you overpay, they will have unrealistic expectations if they move on in the future – and you might have some disgruntled current employees if word gets out.

Remember, you get what you pay for, so make sure your offering is in line with your requirements.

5. Deal breakers

Degrees, industry experience, systems, typing speed, visas… Are they deal breakers for you? Let us know. If you have an unwavering condition that must be met, save yourself and candidates the headache of going through the recruitment process, only to fall at a technical hurdle that went unmentioned.

I cannot promise you that all candidates will read every word of a job description (you could type “Excel” in flashing neon yellow and some people won’t notice), but make sure your JD supports you when people ask why they were not considered.

A strong job description should be accurate, attractive – to the right people – and paint an honest picture. I would love to hear people’s feedback/stories on this, or any good tips you have to create a great JD. Please feel free leave a comment below.

Tags: Client Tools | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Sydney | Temporary Recruitment |

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