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  string(5315) "Behavioural-based interviews- who enjoys them? You’re not alone! Often behavioural interview questions are not as they seem as there are other factors that come into play that you may not be aware of. Unfortunately, there is no way to escape them for the majority of us, as it is often a vital part of the recruitment process.

Don’t be fooled, they are not as difficult as you think. Let’s take a look at how you can best prepare:

1     Prepare

The first initial step is simple- do your research. Research the company and gather as much insider knowledge as possible. If you have been represented by a recruiter – make use of it. They will be able give you an insight into the current structure of the business, the team and culture.

The next step would be to study the job description. Having a job description will be advantageous as it will not only give you an insight into the role, but it will also aid in predicting what you will be asked.

For example, if you are going for the position of an Office Manager, you can envisage the questions will revolve around your organisation skills, leadership and your ability to multi-task or ability to support a wider team.

2     Structure

The next step is to structure your answers. This is when the old faithful Situation-Task-Action-Result approach comes into play. To ensure that your answers meet the interviewer’s requirements it is important that you follow this structure to avoid unwanted “waffling” which we can easily fall into if not prepared.

It is also important to remember to put a face/name to the situation as well. A lot of people fall into the trap of being too generic, who knew that a simple “John” or “Bob” could save us in an interview.

3     Be Resourceful

Why stress yourself out trying to have 10 different situations for 10 different questions? Be resourceful. Think of a particular situation in your working career that can relate to more than one question.

For example, if you are going for an Executive Assistant position and just thought of a situation in your career of a major function that you had to plan for the executive board members and their clients. Things didn’t go to plan from the start as the catering was late and there were a shortage of waiters.  You then took charge and arranged for a few of the Administrators to step into the role, while the food was being served. You then arranged for yourself and other colleagues to go to a local café/supermarket to obtain some pre-nibbles. This in turn saved the night and the board members plus guests did not even notice that there was an issue. There was positive feedback the next day both internally and externally. This example can be used for questions such as teamwork, working under pressure, displaying leadership, a time when you have failed and displaying initiative.

4     Keep it simple

Many people believe that they need to have a unique example, something that would set them apart from the crowd. This is a common misconception and in reality you need to keep it simple and believable. The interviewer often looks at how you structure the answers, your communication skills and your fit within their organisation.

If you decide to make things complex, it will often lead to “waffling” and will throw you off track of the main points that you are trying to get across. Also, take your time to answer the questions and stick the S.T.A.R model. There is no point in rushing your way through the answer if you are not going to present it properly.

5     Common Behavioural Questions
  • Tell me a time when you have gone above and beyond your job description
  • Tell me a time when you have displayed leadership
  • Tell me a time you have dealt with a difficult colleague, manager or customer
  • Tell me a time when you had multiple responsibilities and how you managed your day
  • Tell me a time of when you have failed, how did you manage it?
  • Tell me a time when you worked within a team to reach the same goal
  • How do you handle pressure?
The list can go on. However you should already establish from Section 1 through the preparation stage what types of questions will be asked. Of course they will vary depending on the position that you applied for, but with this guide it should hopefully make you more confident in tackling a behavioural based interview. Good luck!   Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide" ["post_title"]=> string(51) "5 Tips for a Successful Behavioural Based Interview" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(133) "Don’t be fooled, behavioural based interviews are not as difficult as you think. Let’s take a look at how you can best prepare..." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(51) "5-tips-for-a-successful-behavioural-based-interview" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(134) "http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/the-importance-of-team-work/ http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/you-dont-need-a-title-to-be-a-leader/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-09-07 10:20:45" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-09-07 00:20:45" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(40) "http://118.127.43.121/~coxpurtell/?p=420" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" }

Behavioural-based interviews- who enjoys them? You’re not alone! Often behavioural interview questions are not as they seem as there are other factors that come into play that you may not be aware of. Unfortunately, there is no way to escape them for the majority of us, as it is often a vital part of the recruitment process.

Don’t be fooled, they are not as difficult as you think. Let’s take a look at how you can best prepare:

1     Prepare

The first initial step is simple- do your research. Research the company and gather as much insider knowledge as possible. If you have been represented by a recruiter – make use of it. They will be able give you an insight into the current structure of the business, the team and culture.

The next step would be to study the job description. Having a job description will be advantageous as it will not only give you an insight into the role, but it will also aid in predicting what you will be asked.

For example, if you are going for the position of an Office Manager, you can envisage the questions will revolve around your organisation skills, leadership and your ability to multi-task or ability to support a wider team.

2     Structure

The next step is to structure your answers. This is when the old faithful Situation-Task-Action-Result approach comes into play. To ensure that your answers meet the interviewer’s requirements it is important that you follow this structure to avoid unwanted “waffling” which we can easily fall into if not prepared.

It is also important to remember to put a face/name to the situation as well. A lot of people fall into the trap of being too generic, who knew that a simple “John” or “Bob” could save us in an interview.

3     Be Resourceful

Why stress yourself out trying to have 10 different situations for 10 different questions? Be resourceful. Think of a particular situation in your working career that can relate to more than one question.

For example, if you are going for an Executive Assistant position and just thought of a situation in your career of a major function that you had to plan for the executive board members and their clients. Things didn’t go to plan from the start as the catering was late and there were a shortage of waiters.  You then took charge and arranged for a few of the Administrators to step into the role, while the food was being served. You then arranged for yourself and other colleagues to go to a local café/supermarket to obtain some pre-nibbles. This in turn saved the night and the board members plus guests did not even notice that there was an issue. There was positive feedback the next day both internally and externally. This example can be used for questions such as teamwork, working under pressure, displaying leadership, a time when you have failed and displaying initiative.

4     Keep it simple

Many people believe that they need to have a unique example, something that would set them apart from the crowd. This is a common misconception and in reality you need to keep it simple and believable. The interviewer often looks at how you structure the answers, your communication skills and your fit within their organisation.

If you decide to make things complex, it will often lead to “waffling” and will throw you off track of the main points that you are trying to get across. Also, take your time to answer the questions and stick the S.T.A.R model. There is no point in rushing your way through the answer if you are not going to present it properly.

5     Common Behavioural Questions

  • Tell me a time when you have gone above and beyond your job description
  • Tell me a time when you have displayed leadership
  • Tell me a time you have dealt with a difficult colleague, manager or customer
  • Tell me a time when you had multiple responsibilities and how you managed your day
  • Tell me a time of when you have failed, how did you manage it?
  • Tell me a time when you worked within a team to reach the same goal
  • How do you handle pressure?

The list can go on. However you should already establish from Section 1 through the preparation stage what types of questions will be asked. Of course they will vary depending on the position that you applied for, but with this guide it should hopefully make you more confident in tackling a behavioural based interview.

Good luck!

 

Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide

Tags: Behavioural Based Interviews | Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Interview Tips | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Melbourne | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney | Temporary Recruitment | Temps |

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