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  string(19) "2014-10-23 03:45:00"
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  string(4048) "This week I, thankfully, and finally, have been diagnosed with Coeliac disease. I say thankfully because I have battled with my health for the last 10 years, and have been unable to comprehend why I don’t have the same energy levels as my peers. So this week, I had a consultation with a doctor who was determined to get me on the path to good health, and it was with much relief that I finally came away with a diagnosis, along with a membership of the Coeliac Society!

This whole experience taught me a great deal about perseverance and persistence.

Having for years been given unnecessary prescriptions and doors metaphorically slammed in my face time and time again by doctors on both sides of the world, I had quite a few moments where I could have just given up and accepted my fate  as someone who was just not quite healthy. But I just knew, I knew deep down that something wasn’t right and despite doctors just advising me to “take it easy” and “rest up” and “have another dose of antibiotics”.

I knew that I needed to keep going and determine what exactly was wrong in order to treat it. And I did just that, I kept going and I found a practice with an integrative approach to medicine which was finally able to give me a diagnosis – ten years down the road!

This lesson on always trusting your instincts is something that I can easily channel into my recruitment career. We, as consultants, dealing with high volumes of people every day, are trained to make rational and logical decisions. We adhere to processes and work with a formula to ensure that we deliver results by sourcing the best candidate for the best job and providing the best service to our clients.

But we are also trained to listen to our instincts and this instinct, the part of your brain which works off emotion rather than logic, is almost always right.  If I meet a candidate who may not on paper meet a client’s brief but something feels right; they are a great fit culturally and hold the attributes that my client values, then I will run with that  and I will put a case for my client who will hopefully trust my instincts too.

Candidates, this is also something to keep front of mind. When you are looking for a dream job and are meeting recruiters, meeting hiring managers and researching positions, think about the rational side of your search: yes, the location, position, salary, the blacks and whites. But, more importantly, follow and trust your gut. Allow what feels right to be a major factor in your decision making process.

Simon Senek, an author who delivered a Ted Talk in 2009, spoke about how our brains are made up. The Limbic system is the “emotional brain” which is responsible for emotions, feelings, behaviour and decision making. The Neocortex brain is the rational side, responsible for language and analysis.

Simon goes on to explain that, interestingly, the limbic system, despite being the decision making side, doesn’t have a capacity for language and so, this is where our “gut instinct” comes in to play. The decision has been made by your limbic system, but its inability to use language results in us concluding that “you can’t put your finger” on something or it “just doesn’t feel right”.

My experience with discovering that I am coeliac has taught me a valuable life lesson, which is this – despite what people say, despite the direction they try to steer you in and the negativity they may preach, always always find the strength to persevere, persist and follow your gut instincts."
  ["post_title"]=>
  string(22) "Always Follow Your Gut"
  ["post_excerpt"]=>
  string(138) "I’m always faced with the conversation of interview preparation and I want to share key elements that will help you master an interview."
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  string(112) "http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/from-accountant-to-consultant/
http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/culture-club/"
  ["post_modified"]=>
  string(19) "2017-06-07 14:58:24"
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This week I, thankfully, and finally, have been diagnosed with Coeliac disease. I say thankfully because I have battled with my health for the last 10 years, and have been unable to comprehend why I don’t have the same energy levels as my peers. So this week, I had a consultation with a doctor who was determined to get me on the path to good health, and it was with much relief that I finally came away with a diagnosis, along with a membership of the Coeliac Society!

This whole experience taught me a great deal about perseverance and persistence.

Having for years been given unnecessary prescriptions and doors metaphorically slammed in my face time and time again by doctors on both sides of the world, I had quite a few moments where I could have just given up and accepted my fate  as someone who was just not quite healthy. But I just knew, I knew deep down that something wasn’t right and despite doctors just advising me to “take it easy” and “rest up” and “have another dose of antibiotics”.

I knew that I needed to keep going and determine what exactly was wrong in order to treat it. And I did just that, I kept going and I found a practice with an integrative approach to medicine which was finally able to give me a diagnosis – ten years down the road!

This lesson on always trusting your instincts is something that I can easily channel into my recruitment career. We, as consultants, dealing with high volumes of people every day, are trained to make rational and logical decisions. We adhere to processes and work with a formula to ensure that we deliver results by sourcing the best candidate for the best job and providing the best service to our clients.

But we are also trained to listen to our instincts and this instinct, the part of your brain which works off emotion rather than logic, is almost always right.  If I meet a candidate who may not on paper meet a client’s brief but something feels right; they are a great fit culturally and hold the attributes that my client values, then I will run with that  and I will put a case for my client who will hopefully trust my instincts too.

Candidates, this is also something to keep front of mind. When you are looking for a dream job and are meeting recruiters, meeting hiring managers and researching positions, think about the rational side of your search: yes, the location, position, salary, the blacks and whites. But, more importantly, follow and trust your gut. Allow what feels right to be a major factor in your decision making process.

Simon Senek, an author who delivered a Ted Talk in 2009, spoke about how our brains are made up. The Limbic system is the “emotional brain” which is responsible for emotions, feelings, behaviour and decision making. The Neocortex brain is the rational side, responsible for language and analysis.

Simon goes on to explain that, interestingly, the limbic system, despite being the decision making side, doesn’t have a capacity for language and so, this is where our “gut instinct” comes in to play. The decision has been made by your limbic system, but its inability to use language results in us concluding that “you can’t put your finger” on something or it “just doesn’t feel right”.

My experience with discovering that I am coeliac has taught me a valuable life lesson, which is this – despite what people say, despite the direction they try to steer you in and the negativity they may preach, always always find the strength to persevere, persist and follow your gut instincts.

Tags: Career | Coeliac | Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Effort | Job Search | Permanent Recruitment | Perseverence | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Melbourne | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney | Temporary Recruitment |

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