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  string(19) "2015-06-01 10:05:16"
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  string(5077) "I have been lucky in both my careers to date in that I have always sought out and found mentors and benefited from their wisdom which has resulted in me making good decisions (I think!) relating to both my work and personal situation.

Having only changed companies 4 times over the last 20 years, it's fair to say that once I am engaged in a business I tend to stick around. This record is even more consistent when you factor in that I have changed country twice in that timeframe.

Throughout my journey I’ve heard many times that you should never, ever offer or accept a counter offer. Statistics say, as the anti-counter-offer brigade likes to point out, that the average person who accepts a counter offer is gone from his or her job within six months anyway.

To be fair there are some damning statistics that point to this as being true just “google it” and the pages of results include posts from LinkedIn, Forbes, US News and a plethora of consulting organisations, career blogs etc all with the consistent theme “Say No to Counter Offers”.

Having worked in the Sydney market for over 10 years I have experienced the two main recruitment environments:

Job Rich & Candidate Poor and Job Poor & Candidate Rich

Over this time I estimate that I have interviewed over 5,000 candidates and had a similar amount of client side meetings so while I have not personally had too much experience of changing jobs. I do however have a myriad of experience listening to both sides of the recruitment coin helping candidates and clients navigate the murky waters of counter offers. I have developed my own “counter offer tool kit” to help people make informed decisions on their career. Motive Why do you want to leave? Is it for personal, professional or financial reasons? You need to be crystal clear on why you started looking for a new job in the first place and then decide if that reason or reasons will change if you accept a counter offer. There is no point staying if it will not benefit your career in the medium to long term. Content What is the content of the counter offer? Is it purely financial? If it is only financial will that really sort out your motive? Will you suddenly like your manager more now because you are being paid more to like them? Money can’t fix everything and in fact salary is not the main driver of work satisfaction these days. Short term, sure you might afford a holiday or a new car and everything might seem rosy! Have they just brought forward your next scheduled review so you will not get another pay increase for 18 months? If you are promoted how will your peers react? Will this damage your working relationships? These are the things that make your role untenable down the track when the short term gain has worn off. Loyalty Did you discuss your situation with your current employer before you started a job search? If you did not feel comfortable asking for a new challenge, extra project work, more stimulating work or study support why would you think that they will not be upset that you are presenting them with what they would view as an ultimatum? You should be able to speak with your employer openly about your career and goals before you go to the job market. If you can’t then I would imagine that you will end up another counter offer statistic! Well run, considerate organisations with a solid culture don’t need to make counter offers as their staff have open communication around career goals, salaries, training & development and high employee engagement. So before you start your next job search think about your career and where you want it to lead. Can your current employer get you there over time? How did your last review go? Can you approach them and be open about your career aspirations? If you have gone through this process and decide that you need a new job then you shouldn’t take a counter offer as it will be to your detriment. If you haven’t already, I suggest that you speak candidly in your next review or even have a coffee with your manager to tell them where you are at! After all, no one likes an ultimatum so why put yourself into that position?   Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide        " ["post_title"]=> string(25) "Beware the Counter Offer!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(156) "What is the content of the counter offer? If it is only financial will you suddenly like your manager more now because you are being paid more to like them?" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(24) "beware-the-counter-offer" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(241) "http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/guru-hunting/ http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/maximise-your-job-search-in-6-easy-steps/ http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/culture-club/ http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/why-you-should-never-stop-learning/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-07-23 22:04:19" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-07-23 12:04:19" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(36) "http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/?p=4464" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" }

I have been lucky in both my careers to date in that I have always sought out and found mentors and benefited from their wisdom which has resulted in me making good decisions (I think!) relating to both my work and personal situation.

Having only changed companies 4 times over the last 20 years, it’s fair to say that once I am engaged in a business I tend to stick around. This record is even more consistent when you factor in that I have changed country twice in that timeframe.

Throughout my journey I’ve heard many times that you should never, ever offer or accept a counter offer. Statistics say, as the anti-counter-offer brigade likes to point out, that the average person who accepts a counter offer is gone from his or her job within six months anyway.

To be fair there are some damning statistics that point to this as being true just “google it” and the pages of results include posts from LinkedIn, Forbes, US News and a plethora of consulting organisations, career blogs etc all with the consistent theme “Say No to Counter Offers”.

Having worked in the Sydney market for over 10 years I have experienced the two main recruitment environments:

Job Rich & Candidate Poor and Job Poor & Candidate Rich

Over this time I estimate that I have interviewed over 5,000 candidates and had a similar amount of client side meetings so while I have not personally had too much experience of changing jobs. I do however have a myriad of experience listening to both sides of the recruitment coin helping candidates and clients navigate the murky waters of counter offers.

I have developed my own “counter offer tool kit” to help people make informed decisions on their career.

Motive

Why do you want to leave? Is it for personal, professional or financial reasons? You need to be crystal clear on why you started looking for a new job in the first place and then decide if that reason or reasons will change if you accept a counter offer. There is no point staying if it will not benefit your career in the medium to long term.

Content

What is the content of the counter offer? Is it purely financial? If it is only financial will that really sort out your motive? Will you suddenly like your manager more now because you are being paid more to like them? Money can’t fix everything and in fact salary is not the main driver of work satisfaction these days.

Short term, sure you might afford a holiday or a new car and everything might seem rosy! Have they just brought forward your next scheduled review so you will not get another pay increase for 18 months?

If you are promoted how will your peers react? Will this damage your working relationships? These are the things that make your role untenable down the track when the short term gain has worn off.

Loyalty

Did you discuss your situation with your current employer before you started a job search? If you did not feel comfortable asking for a new challenge, extra project work, more stimulating work or study support why would you think that they will not be upset that you are presenting them with what they would view as an ultimatum?

You should be able to speak with your employer openly about your career and goals before you go to the job market. If you can’t then I would imagine that you will end up another counter offer statistic!

Well run, considerate organisations with a solid culture don’t need to make counter offers as their staff have open communication around career goals, salaries, training & development and high employee engagement.

So before you start your next job search think about your career and where you want it to lead. Can your current employer get you there over time? How did your last review go? Can you approach them and be open about your career aspirations?

If you have gone through this process and decide that you need a new job then you shouldn’t take a counter offer as it will be to your detriment.

If you haven’t already, I suggest that you speak candidly in your next review or even have a coffee with your manager to tell them where you are at!

After all, no one likes an ultimatum so why put yourself into that position?

 

Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide

 

 

 

 

Tags: Counter Offer | Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Hiring | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Melbourne | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney | Temporary Recruitment |

One thought on “Beware the Counter Offer!

  1. Great website guys – very impressive. With regards to counter offers, I really do hope others read this. In my experience, those who are countered and stay, still leave after the next 12 months. It’s so important that a job seeker considers their reasons for leaving very seriously before making a move to market. However, I think too many employees simply don’t have a transparent relationship with their manager(s), and the only time they get to air the grievances is when they have another offer on the table !

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