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  string(4944) "Biography is not destiny. This is something Tony Robbins said in a TED talk back in 2006, it is a powerful statement, don't let the past ruin your future! I took a lot from the short talk he gave and I have been thinking about how not only I can change my own future but how can I help shape the destiny of others.

After all, I am in the perfect industry to be helping people - A passionate and professional recruiter helps people every day.

The contradiction I see with the title statement is that while every organisation is 'branding' themselves with beliefs of growth and opportunity to attract talent it is very contradictory to the way many organisations run their recruitment processes. They base decisions on the past for example what a candidate’s average mark was in university or if they started in a "Big 4" accounting firm or a "tier 1" legal firm.

Now don't get me wrong, I am not saying we should throw the baby out with the bath water. I was grateful when I had my tibia and fibula screwed back together that the surgeon had done it before and was a qualified specialist! In reality I didn't know anything about his background, where he went to school or which Uni he studied at or what his GPA was, had he operated on this type of injury before? It was his competence in explaining to me what was going to happen, how it would happen and the comfort I found in his communication style (might have been the pain medication) that convinced me he was an expert. Thankfully that has proven to be the case and I am a happy little vegemite now back running, jumping and horsing around with my kids.

It's an occupational hazard that I spend a lot of time talking to people about recruitment. Helping candidates prepare, guiding them through having a good CV, a professional online profile (not just LinkedIn, companies look at your other profiles too) advising clients on what their options are, if they are looking for the right things, and trying to impart knowledge of both successes and failures to my team and colleagues.

The contradiction is this is people involved in recruitment processes and setting up recruitment strategies push out memes and posts by Sir Richard Branson, Oprah Winfrey, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Elizabeth Holmes the list is endless. The truth is none of these extraordinary people would ever have been offered a job in a bank, Accounting firm, Law firm or many top 50 ASX or Fortune 50 organisations. For a start they would have been filtered out in a CV culling process before a word was spoken to them.

A recruitment "professional" sent me an email last week saying that their process to decide on a candidates "fit" is based initially on their CV? Really! Fit is a product of a person’s characteristics and the work environment. Surely you need to meet someone and speak to them to see if they "fit". It makes me wonder how many Sir Richard Brandon's they decided not to interview in their last campaign.

Hiring new staff is an organisations BEST opportunity to make their company better, more productive and more efficient. It's an opportunity to grow. Is "5 years’ experience in a similar role" really that important?

To be honest if I am in the same role in 5 years I will consider myself a failure as I will not have grown as an individual and my company will possibly not have reached their potential either. Sounds like a lose-lose to me!

Please do yourself and your organisation a favour, next time you need to hire someone don't let their biography prevent you from looking at their destiny! Look for the competencies that you need to help your business grow: Is it passion, emotional intelligence, persuasiveness, determination, accountability? Or is it someone who had a HD average in uni (10 years ago) and with experience doing the same job (possibly badly) for 3 or 5 years?

Make your recruitment process inclusive and not exclusive! Broadening your search increases your chances of achieving a better result. Of course, combine your search to still look at what a person has done. After all if you need a lawyer they need to be qualified, I get that, but also look at what their potential is by finding out about their why! What makes them tick? What drives them? What do they want to achieve?

If you are interested in hearing about how Cox Purtell use science to map a person’s competencies using Ability Map please get in touch for a demonstration. I encourage feedback so please leave a comment below or find me on Twitter @AlanC_CP."
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Biography is not destiny. This is something Tony Robbins said in a TED talk back in 2006, it is a powerful statement, don’t let the past ruin your future! I took a lot from the short talk he gave and I have been thinking about how not only I can change my own future but how can I help shape the destiny of others.

After all, I am in the perfect industry to be helping people – A passionate and professional recruiter helps people every day.

The contradiction I see with the title statement is that while every organisation is ‘branding’ themselves with beliefs of growth and opportunity to attract talent it is very contradictory to the way many organisations run their recruitment processes. They base decisions on the past for example what a candidate’s average mark was in university or if they started in a “Big 4” accounting firm or a “tier 1” legal firm.

Now don’t get me wrong, I am not saying we should throw the baby out with the bath water. I was grateful when I had my tibia and fibula screwed back together that the surgeon had done it before and was a qualified specialist! In reality I didn’t know anything about his background, where he went to school or which Uni he studied at or what his GPA was, had he operated on this type of injury before? It was his competence in explaining to me what was going to happen, how it would happen and the comfort I found in his communication style (might have been the pain medication) that convinced me he was an expert. Thankfully that has proven to be the case and I am a happy little vegemite now back running, jumping and horsing around with my kids.

It’s an occupational hazard that I spend a lot of time talking to people about recruitment. Helping candidates prepare, guiding them through having a good CV, a professional online profile (not just LinkedIn, companies look at your other profiles too) advising clients on what their options are, if they are looking for the right things, and trying to impart knowledge of both successes and failures to my team and colleagues.

The contradiction is this is people involved in recruitment processes and setting up recruitment strategies push out memes and posts by Sir Richard Branson, Oprah Winfrey, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Elizabeth Holmes the list is endless. The truth is none of these extraordinary people would ever have been offered a job in a bank, Accounting firm, Law firm or many top 50 ASX or Fortune 50 organisations. For a start they would have been filtered out in a CV culling process before a word was spoken to them.

A recruitment “professional” sent me an email last week saying that their process to decide on a candidates “fit” is based initially on their CV? Really! Fit is a product of a person’s characteristics and the work environment. Surely you need to meet someone and speak to them to see if they “fit”. It makes me wonder how many Sir Richard Brandon’s they decided not to interview in their last campaign.

Hiring new staff is an organisations BEST opportunity to make their company better, more productive and more efficient. It’s an opportunity to grow. Is “5 years’ experience in a similar role” really that important?

To be honest if I am in the same role in 5 years I will consider myself a failure as I will not have grown as an individual and my company will possibly not have reached their potential either. Sounds like a lose-lose to me!

Please do yourself and your organisation a favour, next time you need to hire someone don’t let their biography prevent you from looking at their destiny! Look for the competencies that you need to help your business grow: Is it passion, emotional intelligence, persuasiveness, determination, accountability? Or is it someone who had a HD average in uni (10 years ago) and with experience doing the same job (possibly badly) for 3 or 5 years?

Make your recruitment process inclusive and not exclusive! Broadening your search increases your chances of achieving a better result. Of course, combine your search to still look at what a person has done. After all if you need a lawyer they need to be qualified, I get that, but also look at what their potential is by finding out about their why! What makes them tick? What drives them? What do they want to achieve?

If you are interested in hearing about how Cox Purtell use science to map a person’s competencies using Ability Map please get in touch for a demonstration. I encourage feedback so please leave a comment below or find me on Twitter @AlanC_CP.

Tags: Professional Development | Recruitment |

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