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  ["ID"]=>
  int(7554)
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  ["post_date"]=>
  string(19) "2015-12-02 13:19:11"
  ["post_date_gmt"]=>
  string(19) "2015-12-02 03:19:11"
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  string(5388) "Tell a joke.

This is the 29th suggestion on Blogging Online’s tips for blog success. To be honest I was reading the article as I was struggling to get the idea’s flowing for my blog which is well overdue.

It was more by accident than by design but when I read “tell a joke” I thought that it was a little risky as comedy is subjective…this was the lightbulb moment for me as I have been speaking a lot with my clients, peers and colleagues for the last few months about subjectivity in the recruitment process and more broadly in human nature.

The recruitment process is fraught with pitfalls, obstacles and disappointments and many business leaders are tempted to hire individuals who closely match their own values, skills and persona. However, in doing so, they risk passing over candidates who can bring valuable complementary attributes and skills to their business.

I have been reading blogs about finding the “Purple Squirrel” or the “Unicorn” candidate and often the reason these candidates are sought after is because the hirer wants a carbon copy of what they think is important in the role based on the last person in the role or what their perception of what is important. More often than not the “Unicorn” ends up not being the ideal hire.

Consider this:

ACME Manufacturing co. are looking for a Sales Executive, so the hiring manager dictates that the successful candidate must have specific industry experience, specific systems experience and a specific number of years’ experience. So they advertise online and cross their fingers that this purple squirrel applies. They reject applicants who have Technology sales, professional services, Logistics and other experience because they have no manufacturing experience.

After being disappointed by their advert response, they call an agency and give them the same brief, and guess what? They don’t let the agency present candidates that don’t meet all of the criteria. Sound familiar?

By no coincidence the average time to hire has blown out to 68 working days (it was 26 days in 2010). The Financial Review also put a cost of $500 a day to a business with an open position. This is $34,000 over 68 days!

Now I know every expert in every industry in every profession is going to say that you need experience in a sector to be “good” at the job! Really? Every senior Finance person that I know believes that a good finance person will quickly learn to understand and interpret a chart of accounts and be able to offer value to the company through 'outside of the box' thinking. They don’t come with pre-conceived ideas, they are more open to trying new things.

I also am a firm believer that you give me a smart sales person, they can sell anything. As for sales people, why would a successful sales person from one company join a competitor to sell the same product? If they are a good sales person they will be getting well remunerated, have built strong client relationships and be fulfilled in their role.

This problem transcends job function, industry and years of experience.

Here are some things to consider when you are hiring.
  • Does 10 years’ experience guarantee that the 10 years are successful,? Surely it just means that the person has been in a particular industry for a decade and bears no relevance as to their capability?
  • How much has technology changed the role you are recruiting over the last 10 years? A lot! So why is a decade of experience important when only the last 5 years are relevant to how the job is done today?
  • How much will the job change over the next 10 years? Does it matter what the person has done in the past,? Surely it is more important to focus on how they can be successful into the future!
So what am I saying here? Recruiters both internal and agency have been guilty of focusing on the past, focusing on the “looks right” stereotype candidates with specific skills, specific experience and specific tenure. Fair enough if you are a surgeon these things are relative but for most occupations that are not life and death, recruitment should be all about potential and aptitude. This is no joke. While the unemployment rate in Australia has dropped back to 5.9% youth unemployment is over 12%. We need to change the way we think about hiring and focus on the things that are going to be important in the future.    " ["post_title"]=> string(25) "Blog Tip #29: Tell A Joke" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(86) "Tell a joke. This is the 29th suggestion on Blogging Online’s tips for blog success." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(23) "blog-tip-29-tell-a-joke" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(128) "http://startbloggingonline.com/101-blog-post-ideas-that-make-your-blog-hot/ http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/the-social-future/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-12-03 07:44:43" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-12-02 21:44:43" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(36) "http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/?p=7554" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" }

Tell a joke.

This is the 29th suggestion on Blogging Online’s tips for blog success. To be honest I was reading the article as I was struggling to get the idea’s flowing for my blog which is well overdue.

It was more by accident than by design but when I read “tell a joke” I thought that it was a little risky as comedy is subjective…this was the lightbulb moment for me as I have been speaking a lot with my clients, peers and colleagues for the last few months about subjectivity in the recruitment process and more broadly in human nature.

The recruitment process is fraught with pitfalls, obstacles and disappointments and many business leaders are tempted to hire individuals who closely match their own values, skills and persona. However, in doing so, they risk passing over candidates who can bring valuable complementary attributes and skills to their business.

I have been reading blogs about finding the “Purple Squirrel” or the “Unicorn” candidate and often the reason these candidates are sought after is because the hirer wants a carbon copy of what they think is important in the role based on the last person in the role or what their perception of what is important. More often than not the “Unicorn” ends up not being the ideal hire.

Consider this:

ACME Manufacturing co. are looking for a Sales Executive, so the hiring manager dictates that the successful candidate must have specific industry experience, specific systems experience and a specific number of years’ experience. So they advertise online and cross their fingers that this purple squirrel applies. They reject applicants who have Technology sales, professional services, Logistics and other experience because they have no manufacturing experience.

After being disappointed by their advert response, they call an agency and give them the same brief, and guess what? They don’t let the agency present candidates that don’t meet all of the criteria. Sound familiar?

By no coincidence the average time to hire has blown out to 68 working days (it was 26 days in 2010). The Financial Review also put a cost of $500 a day to a business with an open position. This is $34,000 over 68 days!

Now I know every expert in every industry in every profession is going to say that you need experience in a sector to be “good” at the job! Really? Every senior Finance person that I know believes that a good finance person will quickly learn to understand and interpret a chart of accounts and be able to offer value to the company through ‘outside of the box’ thinking. They don’t come with pre-conceived ideas, they are more open to trying new things.

I also am a firm believer that you give me a smart sales person, they can sell anything. As for sales people, why would a successful sales person from one company join a competitor to sell the same product? If they are a good sales person they will be getting well remunerated, have built strong client relationships and be fulfilled in their role.

This problem transcends job function, industry and years of experience.

Here are some things to consider when you are hiring.

  • Does 10 years’ experience guarantee that the 10 years are successful,? Surely it just means that the person has been in a particular industry for a decade and bears no relevance as to their capability?
  • How much has technology changed the role you are recruiting over the last 10 years? A lot! So why is a decade of experience important when only the last 5 years are relevant to how the job is done today?
  • How much will the job change over the next 10 years? Does it matter what the person has done in the past,? Surely it is more important to focus on how they can be successful into the future!

So what am I saying here? Recruiters both internal and agency have been guilty of focusing on the past, focusing on the “looks right” stereotype candidates with specific skills, specific experience and specific tenure. Fair enough if you are a surgeon these things are relative but for most occupations that are not life and death, recruitment should be all about potential and aptitude.

This is no joke. While the unemployment rate in Australia has dropped back to 5.9% youth unemployment is over 12%.

We need to change the way we think about hiring and focus on the things that are going to be important in the future.

 

 

Tags: Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Permanent Recruitment | Purple Squirrel | Recruiters | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Sydney | Temporary Recruitment |

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