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  string(19) "2015-05-22 12:25:30"
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  string(3975) "At a recent event hosted by Cox Purtell and Culture Amp, founder and CEO Didier Elzinga broached the concept of curiosity and how our minds work when we are actively trying to uncover information.

Using the example of the standard writing pen he asked the room of 60+ people to write down as many questions as possible about the pen. What we discovered was that after five or six questions the theme took a noticeable turn and we started to move away from the practical line of questioning to a more creative, inquisitive and almost existential manner of enquiry.

Referencing Nabokov, he stated “curiosity is insubordination in its purest form”. Now, insubordination is when you actively and knowingly disobey your superior but given that Nabokov was born in 1899 and Mark Zuckerberg was born in 1984 I think we’ve come a long way from thinking of curiosity as insubordination and in the age of social media, the more information the better!

My colleague recently wrote a blog entitled Digital Tattoos: The Experiment which spoke about the information we put out online and the digital footprint we create. As social media is a relatively new phenomenon, it was interesting to see what was still floating around in cyberspace and how did she find this information? By enquiring and sourcing; when you type in Google, you are asking a question.

For me, working with people every day it is imperative to be curious and to ask questions in order to really and truly understand a role, a client and a candidate. At the core and heart of my role, the objective is to match these three things together like a jigsaw puzzle to achieve the perfect outcome for all parties.

How can I do that if I don’t ask the client what the role entails? How do I find the right person for the role if I don’t ask what type of experience the client wants to see? And finally, how do I find a candidate their dream job if I don’t ascertain what they think their next role looks like? To do this, I ask questions.

Imagine going one day and not asking one single person, how they are; or being in work and needing assistance from a colleague and not having the capacity to seek help.

It is impossible to live your personal or professional life without having a curious mind. Try to live one day of your life by not asking one single question to yourself or someone else or wondering about something. Go on, try it, I dare you! It’s impossible.

The proverb “Curiosity killed the cat" was traditionally used to warn of the dangers of unnecessary investigation but the response became “satisfaction/information brought it back” and this is the world we live in today, the age of information.

Questions lead to information and answers which leads to learning and a better understanding of the world we live in, the people we live with and everything in between.

As Albert Einstein once said “I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious”.

Be curious!"
  ["post_title"]=>
  string(24) "Curiosity Killed the Cat"
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  string(117) "Questions lead to information and answers which leads to learning and a better understanding of the world we live in."
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At a recent event hosted by Cox Purtell and Culture Amp, founder and CEO Didier Elzinga broached the concept of curiosity and how our minds work when we are actively trying to uncover information.

Using the example of the standard writing pen he asked the room of 60+ people to write down as many questions as possible about the pen. What we discovered was that after five or six questions the theme took a noticeable turn and we started to move away from the practical line of questioning to a more creative, inquisitive and almost existential manner of enquiry.

Referencing Nabokov, he stated “curiosity is insubordination in its purest form”. Now, insubordination is when you actively and knowingly disobey your superior but given that Nabokov was born in 1899 and Mark Zuckerberg was born in 1984 I think we’ve come a long way from thinking of curiosity as insubordination and in the age of social media, the more information the better!

My colleague recently wrote a blog entitled Digital Tattoos: The Experiment which spoke about the information we put out online and the digital footprint we create. As social media is a relatively new phenomenon, it was interesting to see what was still floating around in cyberspace and how did she find this information? By enquiring and sourcing; when you type in Google, you are asking a question.

For me, working with people every day it is imperative to be curious and to ask questions in order to really and truly understand a role, a client and a candidate. At the core and heart of my role, the objective is to match these three things together like a jigsaw puzzle to achieve the perfect outcome for all parties.

How can I do that if I don’t ask the client what the role entails? How do I find the right person for the role if I don’t ask what type of experience the client wants to see? And finally, how do I find a candidate their dream job if I don’t ascertain what they think their next role looks like? To do this, I ask questions.

Imagine going one day and not asking one single person, how they are; or being in work and needing assistance from a colleague and not having the capacity to seek help.

It is impossible to live your personal or professional life without having a curious mind. Try to live one day of your life by not asking one single question to yourself or someone else or wondering about something. Go on, try it, I dare you! It’s impossible.

The proverb “Curiosity killed the cat” was traditionally used to warn of the dangers of unnecessary investigation but the response became “satisfaction/information brought it back” and this is the world we live in today, the age of information.

Questions lead to information and answers which leads to learning and a better understanding of the world we live in, the people we live with and everything in between.

As Albert Einstein once said “I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious”.

Be curious!

Tags: Company Culture | Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Culture | Curiosity | Hiring | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Melbourne | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney | Temporary Recruitment |

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