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  string(3990) "When we have so much to gain, why do so many of us avoid asking for a pay rise? It’s beneficial to realise your worth and for your employer to acknowledge it. More money is motivating, it can boost your assurance and it will probably make you happier in your job.

Don’t be nervous! Organisations with longevity at the heart of their business strategies will look to foster and retain talent. It’s a two-way street; if an employee feels valued they’ll do their best work, which of course in turn benefits the business.

Here's a quick guide to getting a pay rise.

Know Your Value

Confirm your worth with solid market research. You can benchmark your worth by researching similar job vacancies to check salaries, have a confidential chat to a recruiter you can trust for a fair assessment of the industry sector  or use online salary guides. You can visit The CP Salary Exchange to find out the average pay for your position. Research can be an excellent tool for providing your manager with the hard facts.

Timing is Key

A performance review or end of financial year is an obvious time to consider a salary negotiation but not necessarily recommended. If you think you are entitled to a pay raise make sure you speak up. Don’t wait for a performance review. A better idea is to wait until you have just completed a big project, or won a new client or taken on some new responsibilities. To show you're serious about your request, book a meeting with the relevant people in advance. This will also give them time to prepare and be ready for you, rather than catching them off guard at a potentially bad time. However, you should consider your employer's perspective; if the business is going through a tough time it would be worthwhile to put your request on hold. Don't be greedy! The general rule is, unless your responsibilities change dramatically, don't ask more than once a year.

Preparation

Compile a compelling case for why you deserve a bump in salary. Along with evidence of your recent successes, it's also important to consider the future – how will you continue to learn, deliver, improve and grow? You need to demonstrate your worth to the business, and present your request as a sensible business strategy. Know what your ideal salary is. Have a think outside of the cash component and consider negotiating for additional rewards such as flexible working hours, additional leave, insurance, bonuses, training opportunities and more. These options certainly add value to your salary package. Crucially, know what you're prepared to accept, and how to do so gracefully.

The Negotiation

When you do have the conversation, keep it professional, make sure you relax and, more importantly, believe in yourself. Confidence is paramount. The first 30 seconds is critical to any negotiation. Be on point, keeping it short and precise. No matter how uncomfortable you may be, avoid going off on a tangent to justify your request. There will be plenty of time to cover all the details and your reasoning — put all your cards on the table right at the very beginning.

The Outcome

Should you be presented with a lower offer, don’t feel obliged to accept straight away. Don’t throw away all the preparation and research you have done by making an instant decision. Take time to think about it, and present alternatives if you think there may be some room for manoeuvre. Your requested increase may be rejected. If you are unsuccessful, ask for the reason behind the decision. Reason depending, you could ask to revisit the negotiation in the future. Acknowledge the outcome professionally and thank your manager for their time and consideration." ["post_title"]=> string(26) "Do You Deserve A Pay Rise?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(79) "When we have so much to gain, why do so many of us avoid asking for a pay rise?" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(25) "do-you-deserve-a-pay-rise" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(70) " http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/why-you-should-never-stop-learning/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-07-24 15:50:03" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-07-24 05:50:03" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(36) "http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/?p=3139" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" }

When we have so much to gain, why do so many of us avoid asking for a pay rise? It’s beneficial to realise your worth and for your employer to acknowledge it. More money is motivating, it can boost your assurance and it will probably make you happier in your job.

Don’t be nervous! Organisations with longevity at the heart of their business strategies will look to foster and retain talent. It’s a two-way street; if an employee feels valued they’ll do their best work, which of course in turn benefits the business.

Here’s a quick guide to getting a pay rise.

Know Your Value

Confirm your worth with solid market research.

You can benchmark your worth by researching similar job vacancies to check salaries, have a confidential chat to a recruiter you can trust for a fair assessment of the industry sector  or use online salary guides.

You can visit The CP Salary Exchange to find out the average pay for your position. Research can be an excellent tool for providing your manager with the hard facts.

Timing is Key

A performance review or end of financial year is an obvious time to consider a salary negotiation but not necessarily recommended.

If you think you are entitled to a pay raise make sure you speak up. Don’t wait for a performance review. A better idea is to wait until you have just completed a big project, or won a new client or taken on some new responsibilities.

To show you’re serious about your request, book a meeting with the relevant people in advance. This will also give them time to prepare and be ready for you, rather than catching them off guard at a potentially bad time.

However, you should consider your employer’s perspective; if the business is going through a tough time it would be worthwhile to put your request on hold.

Don’t be greedy! The general rule is, unless your responsibilities change dramatically, don’t ask more than once a year.

Preparation

Compile a compelling case for why you deserve a bump in salary.

Along with evidence of your recent successes, it’s also important to consider the future – how will you continue to learn, deliver, improve and grow? You need to demonstrate your worth to the business, and present your request as a sensible business strategy.

Know what your ideal salary is. Have a think outside of the cash component and consider negotiating for additional rewards such as flexible working hours, additional leave, insurance, bonuses, training opportunities and more. These options certainly add value to your salary package.

Crucially, know what you’re prepared to accept, and how to do so gracefully.

The Negotiation

When you do have the conversation, keep it professional, make sure you relax and, more importantly, believe in yourself. Confidence is paramount.

The first 30 seconds is critical to any negotiation. Be on point, keeping it short and precise. No matter how uncomfortable you may be, avoid going off on a tangent to justify your request.

There will be plenty of time to cover all the details and your reasoning — put all your cards on the table right at the very beginning.

The Outcome

Should you be presented with a lower offer, don’t feel obliged to accept straight away. Don’t throw away all the preparation and research you have done by making an instant decision. Take time to think about it, and present alternatives if you think there may be some room for manoeuvre.

Your requested increase may be rejected. If you are unsuccessful, ask for the reason behind the decision. Reason depending, you could ask to revisit the negotiation in the future.

Acknowledge the outcome professionally and thank your manager for their time and consideration.

Tags: Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Hiring | Negotiation | Pay Rise | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Melbourne | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney | Temporary Recruitment |

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