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  string(3223) "Working in recruitment I’m often asked what is more important: having a degree or relevant experience? This is a question that comes up a lot and I’ve noticed that in today’s market, higher education is unfairly valued more than industry experience, and it’s becoming problematic. I want to understand why this is and why there’s a degree of pretension around it.

Looking at my parents, neither of them have a degree and both run very successful businesses. The majority of my my parent's generation left school at the age of 15 and went into the workforce as apprentices. During their youth it was unusual to attend university as it was a privilege reserved for the very wealthy or intellectual elite.

When did this start to change within our culture? There is clearly an added pressure for the younger generation to attend university. In an article written by Danny Dorling for The Guardian, he discusses how students are given limited choice and are shoehorned into degrees at very young ages. I remember being 17 years old and being terrified of not going to university as I was given no alternative.

Don’t get me wrong, higher education is never a bad thing and it should be more accessible. But is it always necessary?

Julia Hartley-Brewer, writer for the Daily Telegraph, notes that our workforce is highly skilled but are faced with limited graduate jobs to match. She then considers that higher education should be for the elite, that it is not for everyone, and now we have graduates who have spent the last 3-5 years at university who cannot get a job.

Blogger for the Huffington Post, Chloe Kenyon states “Experience however, creates differences between graduates. It puts which university you have attended, or what grade you achieved, out of the spotlight somewhat”. She goes on to say that having a degree and experience, will make a candidate stronger than those who've spent the last 3 years in the library!

I think its important to have an education and it does show sticking power, however candidates who've been working for 3 years rather than studying should not be under estimated.

In my opinion, experience in the right areas should be worth as much as a degree, if not more.

What do you think?

 

Articles referenced:

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/sep/19/university-tuition-fees-students-delay-going

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/11811928/University-was-never-meant-to-be-for-everybody.-Young-people-have-been-sold-a-lie.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/chloe-kenyon/career-advice_b_7485348.html

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Working in recruitment I’m often asked what is more important: having a degree or relevant experience? This is a question that comes up a lot and I’ve noticed that in today’s market, higher education is unfairly valued more than industry experience, and it’s becoming problematic. I want to understand why this is and why there’s a degree of pretension around it.

Looking at my parents, neither of them have a degree and both run very successful businesses. The majority of my my parent’s generation left school at the age of 15 and went into the workforce as apprentices. During their youth it was unusual to attend university as it was a privilege reserved for the very wealthy or intellectual elite.

When did this start to change within our culture? There is clearly an added pressure for the younger generation to attend university. In an article written by Danny Dorling for The Guardian, he discusses how students are given limited choice and are shoehorned into degrees at very young ages. I remember being 17 years old and being terrified of not going to university as I was given no alternative.

Don’t get me wrong, higher education is never a bad thing and it should be more accessible. But is it always necessary?

Julia Hartley-Brewer, writer for the Daily Telegraph, notes that our workforce is highly skilled but are faced with limited graduate jobs to match. She then considers that higher education should be for the elite, that it is not for everyone, and now we have graduates who have spent the last 3-5 years at university who cannot get a job.

Blogger for the Huffington Post, Chloe Kenyon states “Experience however, creates differences between graduates. It puts which university you have attended, or what grade you achieved, out of the spotlight somewhat”. She goes on to say that having a degree and experience, will make a candidate stronger than those who’ve spent the last 3 years in the library!

I think its important to have an education and it does show sticking power, however candidates who’ve been working for 3 years rather than studying should not be under estimated.

In my opinion, experience in the right areas should be worth as much as a degree, if not more.

What do you think?

 

Articles referenced:

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/sep/19/university-tuition-fees-students-delay-going

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/11811928/University-was-never-meant-to-be-for-everybody.-Young-people-have-been-sold-a-lie.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/chloe-kenyon/career-advice_b_7485348.html

 

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One thought on “Education or Experience: What Do You Value More?

  1. I completely agree Amelia, yes degrees are very valuable but without experience you will struggle against someone who’s “been there, done that” – often frequently already connected and recommended within their industry! Thoughts?

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