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  string(4530) "From Profit & Loss statements, Balance Sheet Reconciliations and Cash Flow Statements to Candidate Registrations, Client Visits and Business Development. Yes, that’s the transition I have recently made. 30 June has come and gone and I didn’t bat an eyelid. Rewind to a year ago and I was in the middle of a busy year end, ensuring month end numbers for June had been finalised and any final adjustments had been accounted for and following that, a visit from the dear auditors.

But here I am – A specialist recruitment consultant in the making, and what a journey it’s been. From auditing, financial, statutory and regulatory reporting to recruitment consulting.

Why the move?

Opportunity: The opportunity to develop a new skill and to be able to find the right person for a particular job is an appealing one. The opportunity to directly contribute to the growth of the company, along with my own personal growth, both, personally and financially, is most satisfying. In addition, the opportunity came along at a time when accounting was no longer a challenge and when I was looking for a change.

My first month in recruitment

It felt like being on a trading floor, but instead of selling shares and other financial instruments, we were selling ourselves. Colleague X was trying to convince her client to hire her candidate, Y was trying to get a visit with a client she’d been chasing for a year now and Z was lining up candidate registrations as if there was no tomorrow. Then I heard the bell. It was a moment of elation, of celebration, of ecstasy. Colleague A had finalised a placement. And me? I was staring at my empty calendar wondering where to start, who to speak to, and what to say. My colleague noticed me do this, to which she quickly said “just pick up the phone and dial, let’s get a visit in the next 10 minutes”, and so it began.

What have I learned?

Activity: In a short space of time it is evident that recruitment is an activity based game. The more active you are, the better the chances you have of being successful. There’s a reason KPIs exist.

Time: Recruitment consultants are time poor. That’s a fact. There are never enough hours in a day to call clients, candidates, undertake and organise interviews, format resumes, and a lot more.

Identity: Your personal brand plays a very big part in being a successful recruiter. When I started at Cox Purtell, I had about 20 odd connections on LinkedIn. Today, I’m close to 150 qualified connections, who I am in touch with at least once a quarter. My aim is to be a trusted advisor and have clients and candidates come to me for opportunities and advice.

Market Share: The Big 4 work towards bringing the biggest and most prestigious firms on their books with an ultimate goal to have the biggest market share, and recruitment works along the same lines. The bigger clients you bring on board, the more work you’re going to have. Similarly, the more clients you have who are willing to use you, the more jobs you are going to have on at any point in time.

Advice to recruitment consultants, both, junior and senior

Now I may not be well placed to give qualified advice to recruiters, however, after speaking with several candidates and clients, the following basic principles MUST be followed for anyone to be a successful recruiter:
  • Contact: Keep your candidates and clients updated on a regular basis.
  • Specialised service: Go the extra mile to service your clients. We live in a competitive world within the recruitment industry and by providing a specialised service to both, clients and candidates, we can make inroads into clients we have not worked with previously.
  • Behaviour: Treat your candidates as you would like to be treated by your clients. Treat them as a person and not a number.
  • Networking: Network, network, network. Attend networking functions, get your name out there and sell your personal brand. In the words of Greg Savage, become a ‘talent magnet’.
  • Manage expectations: Under promise and over deliver.
So, are you adhering to the basic principles above? All of them? Review your activity from the last 3 months and then ask yourself the question again. On that note, I’m off to sign up to the next AMCHAM Networking Event…… Until next time!!   Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide" ["post_title"]=> string(29) "From Accountant to Consultant" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(96) "Here I am – A specialist recruitment consultant in the making, and what a journey it’s been." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(29) "from-accountant-to-consultant" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-07-24 16:12:12" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-07-24 06:12:12" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(40) "http://118.127.43.121/~coxpurtell/?p=623" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" }

From Profit & Loss statements, Balance Sheet Reconciliations and Cash Flow Statements to Candidate Registrations, Client Visits and Business Development. Yes, that’s the transition I have recently made. 30 June has come and gone and I didn’t bat an eyelid. Rewind to a year ago and I was in the middle of a busy year end, ensuring month end numbers for June had been finalised and any final adjustments had been accounted for and following that, a visit from the dear auditors.

But here I am – A specialist recruitment consultant in the making, and what a journey it’s been. From auditing, financial, statutory and regulatory reporting to recruitment consulting.

Why the move?

Opportunity: The opportunity to develop a new skill and to be able to find the right person for a particular job is an appealing one. The opportunity to directly contribute to the growth of the company, along with my own personal growth, both, personally and financially, is most satisfying. In addition, the opportunity came along at a time when accounting was no longer a challenge and when I was looking for a change.

My first month in recruitment

It felt like being on a trading floor, but instead of selling shares and other financial instruments, we were selling ourselves. Colleague X was trying to convince her client to hire her candidate, Y was trying to get a visit with a client she’d been chasing for a year now and Z was lining up candidate registrations as if there was no tomorrow. Then I heard the bell. It was a moment of elation, of celebration, of ecstasy. Colleague A had finalised a placement. And me? I was staring at my empty calendar wondering where to start, who to speak to, and what to say. My colleague noticed me do this, to which she quickly said “just pick up the phone and dial, let’s get a visit in the next 10 minutes”, and so it began.

What have I learned?

Activity: In a short space of time it is evident that recruitment is an activity based game. The more active you are, the better the chances you have of being successful. There’s a reason KPIs exist.

Time: Recruitment consultants are time poor. That’s a fact. There are never enough hours in a day to call clients, candidates, undertake and organise interviews, format resumes, and a lot more.

Identity: Your personal brand plays a very big part in being a successful recruiter. When I started at Cox Purtell, I had about 20 odd connections on LinkedIn. Today, I’m close to 150 qualified connections, who I am in touch with at least once a quarter. My aim is to be a trusted advisor and have clients and candidates come to me for opportunities and advice.

Market Share: The Big 4 work towards bringing the biggest and most prestigious firms on their books with an ultimate goal to have the biggest market share, and recruitment works along the same lines. The bigger clients you bring on board, the more work you’re going to have. Similarly, the more clients you have who are willing to use you, the more jobs you are going to have on at any point in time.

Advice to recruitment consultants, both, junior and senior

Now I may not be well placed to give qualified advice to recruiters, however, after speaking with several candidates and clients, the following basic principles MUST be followed for anyone to be a successful recruiter:

  • Contact: Keep your candidates and clients updated on a regular basis.
  • Specialised service: Go the extra mile to service your clients. We live in a competitive world within the recruitment industry and by providing a specialised service to both, clients and candidates, we can make inroads into clients we have not worked with previously.
  • Behaviour: Treat your candidates as you would like to be treated by your clients. Treat them as a person and not a number.
  • Networking: Network, network, network. Attend networking functions, get your name out there and sell your personal brand. In the words of Greg Savage, become a ‘talent magnet’.
  • Manage expectations: Under promise and over deliver.

So, are you adhering to the basic principles above? All of them? Review your activity from the last 3 months and then ask yourself the question again.

On that note, I’m off to sign up to the next AMCHAM Networking Event…… Until next time!!

 

Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide

Tags: Accountant | Accounting Jobs | Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Finance | Finance Jobs | Learning | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Melbourne | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney | Temporary Recruitment | Temps |

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