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  string(19) "2015-09-07 16:40:11"
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  string(4685) "I’ve recently returned from our industry conference. The setting was Hamilton Island and the theme of the conference was Renewal. I find the annual conference is always a good opportunity to hear from inspiring speakers, network with folk who understand your pain and generally reflect on your own business at a high level.

I always aim to walk away from the conference having met at least 3 or 4 people who I believe are better than me (not hard really!) and implement at least 2 or 3 key learnings (much harder!). Renewal is a great topic because my own business is currently in a period of renewal.

For the week before the conference, I went bareboat sailing with my wife around the Whitsundays. If you’re not aware, bareboat sailing means hiring someone else’s yacht and sailing it yourself – no captain, no crew. A little daunting if you haven’t done that sort of thing by yourself before, which we hadn’t! After a number of lessons, it was the first “solo” step toward a longer term goal of some extensive international sailing.

Whilst on the boat and for the period of the conference I was reading a book on leadership by Major General John Cantwell (Ret.) called Leadership in Action. It’s a very practical and easily relatable guide to leadership.

In a section of the book, Cantwell is discussing strategy and planning. He talks about having a positive mindset but also makes the caveat that hope is not a plan. I had one of those moments of clarity (and discomfort) as I realised that, more than once I have been guilty of having hope as my plan.

What the hell has that got to do with sailing and the conference you ask?

Well, one morning in choppy seas, fast moving current, windy conditions and not too far away from a very rocky looking headland we decided to raise our sails. The main halyard (the rope which hoists the sail up the mast) got tangled around a light on the mast and refused to untangle.

Whilst attempting to fix this problem, we (read “I”) dropped a very small but very crucial and holiday destroying bolt overboard (oops!) and then in an attempt to fix that problem which involved a piggyback and a boat hook, both my wife and I nearly went overboard. Whoah! 15 minutes ago we were drinking tea about to have a fun day of sailing now we’re about to drown and sink a $250,000 boat!

In fact, throughout the entire ‘crisis at sea’, my brain was working overtime “how do we fix this problem?”. I consciously recall thinking “we can solve this”, “we can solve this”. Ok, we made 2 bad decisions which caused everything to snowball but we didn’t give up and suddenly, under pressure, it happened – a stroke of genius, an unorthodox solution.

Within minutes we went from crisis to plain sailing (pun intended) amongst some of the world’s most beautiful islands. We were smiling like nothing had happened (almost). Instead of radioing for help or just freezing in fear we kept working and working and we finally succeeded.

In this situation, it was not so much that we had a plan, but more that we didn’t just cross our fingers and hope it would fix itself. We kept working to make sure we regained control and didn’t leave it to fate.

The prolific theme of the speakers of the conference was disruption and change. Not in a doom and gloom sense but simply in an inevitable way. This year however it was couched in a much more positive setting.

Yes, change is coming but it doesn’t mean the end – in fact, with planning and adaptation, it could mean things are better than ever for our industry.

The underlying warning, though, was that we can’t stand still. We can’t stay the same. We can’t hope and pray that this change, this disruption will pass us by. We need to plan, we need to take action. Yes, we’ll make mistakes but the greatest mistake of all would be to close your eyes and hope.

Day to day I see people hoping that something will change, that it will get better, but not taking any action to make it happen. Inaction and ‘hope’ is easy. Taking action and being prepared to make some mistakes takes courage. I know I don’t want to have that feeling again that hope is my only plan and I’m committing to myself that I won’t.

What are you prepared do to achieve your goals?"
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  string(18) "Hope Is Not A Plan"
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  string(126) "We can’t stand still. We can’t stay the same. We can’t hope and pray that this change, this disruption will pass us by. "
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I’ve recently returned from our industry conference. The setting was Hamilton Island and the theme of the conference was Renewal. I find the annual conference is always a good opportunity to hear from inspiring speakers, network with folk who understand your pain and generally reflect on your own business at a high level.

I always aim to walk away from the conference having met at least 3 or 4 people who I believe are better than me (not hard really!) and implement at least 2 or 3 key learnings (much harder!). Renewal is a great topic because my own business is currently in a period of renewal.

For the week before the conference, I went bareboat sailing with my wife around the Whitsundays. If you’re not aware, bareboat sailing means hiring someone else’s yacht and sailing it yourself – no captain, no crew. A little daunting if you haven’t done that sort of thing by yourself before, which we hadn’t! After a number of lessons, it was the first “solo” step toward a longer term goal of some extensive international sailing.

Whilst on the boat and for the period of the conference I was reading a book on leadership by Major General John Cantwell (Ret.) called Leadership in Action. It’s a very practical and easily relatable guide to leadership.

In a section of the book, Cantwell is discussing strategy and planning. He talks about having a positive mindset but also makes the caveat that hope is not a plan. I had one of those moments of clarity (and discomfort) as I realised that, more than once I have been guilty of having hope as my plan.

What the hell has that got to do with sailing and the conference you ask?

Well, one morning in choppy seas, fast moving current, windy conditions and not too far away from a very rocky looking headland we decided to raise our sails. The main halyard (the rope which hoists the sail up the mast) got tangled around a light on the mast and refused to untangle.

Whilst attempting to fix this problem, we (read “I”) dropped a very small but very crucial and holiday destroying bolt overboard (oops!) and then in an attempt to fix that problem which involved a piggyback and a boat hook, both my wife and I nearly went overboard. Whoah! 15 minutes ago we were drinking tea about to have a fun day of sailing now we’re about to drown and sink a $250,000 boat!

In fact, throughout the entire ‘crisis at sea’, my brain was working overtime “how do we fix this problem?”. I consciously recall thinking “we can solve this”, “we can solve this”. Ok, we made 2 bad decisions which caused everything to snowball but we didn’t give up and suddenly, under pressure, it happened – a stroke of genius, an unorthodox solution.

Within minutes we went from crisis to plain sailing (pun intended) amongst some of the world’s most beautiful islands. We were smiling like nothing had happened (almost). Instead of radioing for help or just freezing in fear we kept working and working and we finally succeeded.

In this situation, it was not so much that we had a plan, but more that we didn’t just cross our fingers and hope it would fix itself. We kept working to make sure we regained control and didn’t leave it to fate.

The prolific theme of the speakers of the conference was disruption and change. Not in a doom and gloom sense but simply in an inevitable way. This year however it was couched in a much more positive setting.

Yes, change is coming but it doesn’t mean the end – in fact, with planning and adaptation, it could mean things are better than ever for our industry.

The underlying warning, though, was that we can’t stand still. We can’t stay the same. We can’t hope and pray that this change, this disruption will pass us by. We need to plan, we need to take action. Yes, we’ll make mistakes but the greatest mistake of all would be to close your eyes and hope.

Day to day I see people hoping that something will change, that it will get better, but not taking any action to make it happen. Inaction and ‘hope’ is easy. Taking action and being prepared to make some mistakes takes courage. I know I don’t want to have that feeling again that hope is my only plan and I’m committing to myself that I won’t.

What are you prepared do to achieve your goals?

Tags: Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Hope | Permanent Recruitment | Professional Development | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Sydney | Technology | Temporary Recruitment |

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