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  string(19) "2014-05-05 06:40:44"
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  string(4173) "For a very long time, I didn’t know how to listen! True story! As a career recruiter, I work with people and unfortunately, based on my daily interactions with people the theory that most individuals genuinely don’t know how to listen is mostly true. So what is the difference between hearing and listening?

How am I an expert? Well I’m not but a few life lessons and learning on the job dealing with people has taught me a few things. Here’s my unofficial and non-accredited take:

Hearing comes naturally for us

Whether we focus or not, we can subconsciously hear things, including individuals talking. As kids or adults, we even have the ability to go into a daze and still hear things, whether it’s your parents lecturing you or as grownups, daydreaming in a board meeting.

Listening is a tool of communication

To listen to someone means you are focusing on what they are saying along with hearing the actual words, you are reading their body language and feeling the emotions associated with the actual content and communication delivery.

Listening is an art! 

It is a skill that you have to learn and most of us didn’t realise it until we were taught and appreciated the differences.

To take it one step further, individuals who are great conversationalists, generally have successfully embraced the art of active or reflective listening.

This is a method of paying attention and responding to another person, which improves the mutual understanding for everyone participating in the conversation. If you are listening attentively, you are not distracted, half listening or half thinking about something else but giving the other person your undivided attention.

To be actively engaged in a conversation, you will naturally demonstrate a more responsive and engaging attitude. Active or reflective listening is a structured form of listening and responding, that inherently focuses the attention on the speaker. The listener must take care to attend to the speaker fully, and often must repeat or paraphrase as appropriate to the conversation and again, demonstrating all of the above signs along the way.

Fast forward to 2014, the era of self-centric way of living life through Facebook, Twitter and the endless social media platforms to assist us to communicate, interact and socialise. However, it is difficult to genuinely demonstrate the art of listening with 0’s and 1’s.

As we continue to embrace technology and work to find the right balance between inadvertently attempting to be the centre of attention and to ensure we continue to be sociable, it is important to continue the pursuit to master the art of active listening.

The key message I would to like to highlight is that once you can master the art of active listening, you are working towards becoming a great conversationalist. Your ability to communicate and demonstrate the ability to listen and genuinely give someone your attention, you will be able to seamlessly evolve small talks into conversations, converting mutual interests which could spark connections, and position yourself to benefit from the connections you have generated will ultimately drive your network.

You will get much further in relationship building if you go down the unselfish route by demonstrating your active and reflective listening skills. A wise man once said, “a few months’ worth of active listening is worth more than a year collecting business cards.”

A true story by yours truly!

 

Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide"
  ["post_title"]=>
  string(43) "“I Hear Ya’ But I’m Not Listening!”"
  ["post_excerpt"]=>
  string(139) "Active listening is a skill that you have to learn and most of us didn’t realise it until we were taught and appreciated the differences."
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  string(118) "http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/the-social-future/
http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/recruitment-why-i-do-what-i-do/"
  ["post_modified"]=>
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For a very long time, I didn’t know how to listen! True story! As a career recruiter, I work with people and unfortunately, based on my daily interactions with people the theory that most individuals genuinely don’t know how to listen is mostly true. So what is the difference between hearing and listening?

How am I an expert? Well I’m not but a few life lessons and learning on the job dealing with people has taught me a few things. Here’s my unofficial and non-accredited take:

Hearing comes naturally for us

Whether we focus or not, we can subconsciously hear things, including individuals talking. As kids or adults, we even have the ability to go into a daze and still hear things, whether it’s your parents lecturing you or as grownups, daydreaming in a board meeting.

Listening is a tool of communication

To listen to someone means you are focusing on what they are saying along with hearing the actual words, you are reading their body language and feeling the emotions associated with the actual content and communication delivery.

Listening is an art! 

It is a skill that you have to learn and most of us didn’t realise it until we were taught and appreciated the differences.

To take it one step further, individuals who are great conversationalists, generally have successfully embraced the art of active or reflective listening.

This is a method of paying attention and responding to another person, which improves the mutual understanding for everyone participating in the conversation. If you are listening attentively, you are not distracted, half listening or half thinking about something else but giving the other person your undivided attention.

To be actively engaged in a conversation, you will naturally demonstrate a more responsive and engaging attitude. Active or reflective listening is a structured form of listening and responding, that inherently focuses the attention on the speaker. The listener must take care to attend to the speaker fully, and often must repeat or paraphrase as appropriate to the conversation and again, demonstrating all of the above signs along the way.

Fast forward to 2014, the era of self-centric way of living life through Facebook, Twitter and the endless social media platforms to assist us to communicate, interact and socialise. However, it is difficult to genuinely demonstrate the art of listening with 0’s and 1’s.

As we continue to embrace technology and work to find the right balance between inadvertently attempting to be the centre of attention and to ensure we continue to be sociable, it is important to continue the pursuit to master the art of active listening.

The key message I would to like to highlight is that once you can master the art of active listening, you are working towards becoming a great conversationalist. Your ability to communicate and demonstrate the ability to listen and genuinely give someone your attention, you will be able to seamlessly evolve small talks into conversations, converting mutual interests which could spark connections, and position yourself to benefit from the connections you have generated will ultimately drive your network.

You will get much further in relationship building if you go down the unselfish route by demonstrating your active and reflective listening skills. A wise man once said, “a few months’ worth of active listening is worth more than a year collecting business cards.”

A true story by yours truly!

 

Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide

Tags: Career | Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Hearing | Listening | Networking | Recruiter | Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Specialist | Recruitment Sydney |

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