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  string(4067) "Last week I caught up with a Senior Manager of a well-known marketing agency who needed some help with their recruitment process. Whilst he was confident in measuring which candidates had the necessary skills to perform each role by examining their resumes, he felt he and his team weren’t getting the most out of the interviews they were conducting and at times were left with more questions than answers.

It was interesting feedback to hear and it was great to get some insight into one of the challenges employers are faced with when looking to hire staff.

I’ve seen businesses create excellent (and often envied) company culture and high performance by hiring the right people.  It sounds simple, but it’s a blind spot that many employers are faced with and it can often lead to disaster.  I’ll save what sort of questions employers should be asking for another time, but here are a few ideas to get you on track to maximising your interviews:

1. Start with a plan

If you can stick to somewhat of a formula, you will find it much easier to compare candidates. Think about using a cheat sheet to keep your interviews systematic.  Its ok, even recruiters use them sometimes.

2. Common questioning

When interviewing multiple people for the same role, there needs to be some level of common questioning of all candidates so you can compare apples with apples. So, prep your cheat sheet with something like:
  • Introductions
  • Common interview questions
  • Person specific interview questions
  • Company overview
  • Reason for vacancy
  • What you’re looking for etc.
  • Next steps (timeframes, references, psych testing etc.)
It’s not rocket science but it’s good to have structure if you don’t do this all the time (and even if you do!) 3. Treat candidates with respect and compassion Of course you’re not going to hire every candidate you interview however even if they aren’t successful, candidates who have had a positive experience whilst interviewing are likely to pass on that positive experience amongst  their peers.  Conversely, candidates who have had a bad experience can really tarnish the brand you have worked hard to develop. 4. Take control of the interview What are you hoping to get out of it?  Are you assessing the candidates’ skills, future potential, culture fit or all of these things?  If you intend to keep the interview informal, you still want information, so plan ahead. 5. Ask smart and rational questions A candidate once told me that during a client interview they had attended they were asked “if you were an animal, what would you be”.  The employer thought that this was a quirky and different way to interview.  It wasn’t.  It made the candidate feel as though they didn’t take interviewing seriously and it completely turned them off the job and the agency. Unless you’re Google or Apple, don’t ask these types of questions. 6. Use different interviewing techniques These days, candidates have been conditioned in interviews by being continuously asked the same questions.  Think of other ways to elicit the information you are looking for.  When I say different though, please don’t use that “if you were an animal” line. 7. Keep candidates informed of the interview process This includes timeframes. An ongoing frustration I hear from candidates is they have been left wondering what the next steps are.  The employers that can keep the interview process moving along (without compromising on its integrity), are the ones who seem to attract and secure the best candidates. I hope this helps to tighten up your interviews so that you can get most out them. Remember: Better interviews = Less interviews = More time to do other things!   Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide" ["post_title"]=> string(23) " Interviewer’s Block?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(77) "Remember: Better interviews = Less interviews = More time to do other things!" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(18) "interviewers-block" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2016-05-04 17:13:18" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2016-05-04 07:13:18" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(40) "http://118.127.43.121/~coxpurtell/?p=396" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" }

Last week I caught up with a Senior Manager of a well-known marketing agency who needed some help with their recruitment process. Whilst he was confident in measuring which candidates had the necessary skills to perform each role by examining their resumes, he felt he and his team weren’t getting the most out of the interviews they were conducting and at times were left with more questions than answers.

It was interesting feedback to hear and it was great to get some insight into one of the challenges employers are faced with when looking to hire staff.

I’ve seen businesses create excellent (and often envied) company culture and high performance by hiring the right people.  It sounds simple, but it’s a blind spot that many employers are faced with and it can often lead to disaster.  I’ll save what sort of questions employers should be asking for another time, but here are a few ideas to get you on track to maximising your interviews:

1. Start with a plan

If you can stick to somewhat of a formula, you will find it much easier to compare candidates. Think about using a cheat sheet to keep your interviews systematic.  Its ok, even recruiters use them sometimes.

2. Common questioning

When interviewing multiple people for the same role, there needs to be some level of common questioning of all candidates so you can compare apples with apples. So, prep your cheat sheet with something like:

  • Introductions
  • Common interview questions
  • Person specific interview questions
  • Company overview
  • Reason for vacancy
  • What you’re looking for etc.
  • Next steps (timeframes, references, psych testing etc.)

It’s not rocket science but it’s good to have structure if you don’t do this all the time (and even if you do!)

3. Treat candidates with respect and compassion

Of course you’re not going to hire every candidate you interview however even if they aren’t successful, candidates who have had a positive experience whilst interviewing are likely to pass on that positive experience amongst  their peers.  Conversely, candidates who have had a bad experience can really tarnish the brand you have worked hard to develop.

4. Take control of the interview

What are you hoping to get out of it?  Are you assessing the candidates’ skills, future potential, culture fit or all of these things?  If you intend to keep the interview informal, you still want information, so plan ahead.

5. Ask smart and rational questions

A candidate once told me that during a client interview they had attended they were asked “if you were an animal, what would you be”.  The employer thought that this was a quirky and different way to interview.  It wasn’t.  It made the candidate feel as though they didn’t take interviewing seriously and it completely turned them off the job and the agency. Unless you’re Google or Apple, don’t ask these types of questions.

6. Use different interviewing techniques

These days, candidates have been conditioned in interviews by being continuously asked the same questions.  Think of other ways to elicit the information you are looking for.  When I say different though, please don’t use that “if you were an animal” line.

7. Keep candidates informed of the interview process

This includes timeframes. An ongoing frustration I hear from candidates is they have been left wondering what the next steps are.  The employers that can keep the interview process moving along (without compromising on its integrity), are the ones who seem to attract and secure the best candidates.

I hope this helps to tighten up your interviews so that you can get most out them.

Remember: Better interviews = Less interviews = More time to do other things!

 

Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide

Tags: Career | Client Tools | Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Interview Tips | Job Interview | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Melbourne | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney | Stand Out | Temporary Recruitment | Temps |

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