object(WP_Post)#4883 (24) {
  ["ID"]=>
  int(587)
  ["post_author"]=>
  string(1) "4"
  ["post_date"]=>
  string(19) "2014-04-28 06:37:25"
  ["post_date_gmt"]=>
  string(19) "2014-04-28 06:37:25"
  ["post_content"]=>
  string(5904) "My inspiration for this blog came from a close friend of mine who is currently working under an uninspiring boss whose lack of leadership has led to the loss of team performance and even resignations.

This compelled me to think back over my career at some of managers and leaders I have worked with and their individual impact on my personal performance, and that of the organisation.

Leadership has been described as:

“A process of social influence in which one person can enlist the aid and support of others in the accomplishment of a common task.”

Some understand a leader simply as somebody whom people follow, or as one who guides or directs others,while others define leadership as organising a group of people to achieve a common goal.

From a professional standpoint, a leader’s success is measured on the performance of their team. Each member of their team carries a responsibility to deliver a specific result, and it is the leader’s role to guide the team to achieve a common goal.

So what is the result when a strong leader is placed in to a position of responsibility? What happens when someone who isn't up to the task is appointed leader?

I turned to a number of my colleagues to get their thoughts, and this was the result.

What are the most important qualities a strong leader must possess?
  • A strong leader must be self aware and conscious of the message they are projecting to their employees and colleagues.
  • A strong leader must be authentic, charismatic and approachable, creating an environment where staff are inspired and can engage in open conversation.
  • The most successful leaders put the best interests of their employees and the organisation before themselves.
  • The best leaders are the ones who are open, fair, show humility and are respectful of their employees and colleagues.
  • A strong leader must earn trust and understanding of their employees, and have the ability to identify strengths and weaknesses, working together to improve on both.
  • And I think most importantly, the best leaders know how to influence people and lead by example.
When I asked my colleagues what the result was working alongside a strong leader there was a common theme:
  • Having a strong mentor resulted in increased knowledge, harnessing strengths, and working together to improve on weaknesses.
  • Working under a strong leader inspires staff and provides a sense ownership over the success of their subordinates.
  • A great leader forms a strong team around them, with each team member accountable to one another.
  • The most common theme was motivation. Every person I asked said they felt highly motivated to achieve and exceed goals working with a strong leader.
Looking on the flipside of the coin, I think everyone has had a bad boss. One that creates an “us and them mentality”, a toxic working environment where people are constantly putting out spot fires rather than being protected from them. The sad reality is many people feel they have worked under more weak leaders than strong ones and I wanted to question what they thought a weak leader was, and this was the result. How would you describe a weak leader?
  • A weak leader is someone with a lack of call to action. Someone who identifies a flaw, or issue and fails to work to resolve it.
  • Weak leaders are ones that won’t get their hands dirty, they work from the safety of their office and refuse to get involved in the day-to-day activities of the staff.
  • Lack of understanding of each employee’s strengths and weaknesses.
  • Poor communication skills, negative and/or patronising tone either in private or in front of counterparts.
  • Someone who fails to see the big picture and obsesses over the minor details.
  • A weak leader can at times be hypocritical, highlighting mistakes that they often make themselves.
When I asked my colleagues how they felt their overall performance was impacted working under a weak leader, again, there was a common theme.
  • Many felt disengaged from the role and the organisation resulting in a lack of passion and belief in what they do.
  • They found themselves second guessing their work as guidance was lacking.
  • Everyone I asked said they felt highly unmotivated, uninspired to perform due to lack of respect and trust for their “leader” resulting poor in overall performance.
  • Some resigned.
Whether you’re an employee, leader or aspiring to be a leader I think everyone who reads this will relate to some parts of this blog. It never ceases to amaze me how commonly people are placed in positions of power and responsibility that are missing some of the most basic leadership qualities. If you are a leader and can relate to the latter part of this blog I encourage you to re-strategise how you manage your people. When you are leading a group of people, remember that they are people with opinions and views. These are the same people you need to be successful in order for you to be successful. Not everyone possess natural leadership qualities, however if you put the needs of your employees and your company before your own, you will begin to form the basis of a strong and successful team.   Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide" ["post_title"]=> string(12) "Lead or Lose" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(67) "What are the most important qualities a strong leader must possess?" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(12) "lead-or-lose" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-02-27 10:53:43" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-02-27 00:53:43" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(40) "http://118.127.43.121/~coxpurtell/?p=587" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "1" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" }

My inspiration for this blog came from a close friend of mine who is currently working under an uninspiring boss whose lack of leadership has led to the loss of team performance and even resignations.

This compelled me to think back over my career at some of managers and leaders I have worked with and their individual impact on my personal performance, and that of the organisation.

Leadership has been described as:

“A process of social influence in which one person can enlist the aid and support of others in the accomplishment of a common task.”

Some understand a leader simply as somebody whom people follow, or as one who guides or directs others,while others define leadership as organising a group of people to achieve a common goal.

From a professional standpoint, a leader’s success is measured on the performance of their team. Each member of their team carries a responsibility to deliver a specific result, and it is the leader’s role to guide the team to achieve a common goal.

So what is the result when a strong leader is placed in to a position of responsibility? What happens when someone who isn’t up to the task is appointed leader?

I turned to a number of my colleagues to get their thoughts, and this was the result.

What are the most important qualities a strong leader must possess?

  • A strong leader must be self aware and conscious of the message they are projecting to their employees and colleagues.
  • A strong leader must be authentic, charismatic and approachable, creating an environment where staff are inspired and can engage in open conversation.
  • The most successful leaders put the best interests of their employees and the organisation before themselves.
  • The best leaders are the ones who are open, fair, show humility and are respectful of their employees and colleagues.
  • A strong leader must earn trust and understanding of their employees, and have the ability to identify strengths and weaknesses, working together to improve on both.
  • And I think most importantly, the best leaders know how to influence people and lead by example.

When I asked my colleagues what the result was working alongside a strong leader there was a common theme:

  • Having a strong mentor resulted in increased knowledge, harnessing strengths, and working together to improve on weaknesses.
  • Working under a strong leader inspires staff and provides a sense ownership over the success of their subordinates.
  • A great leader forms a strong team around them, with each team member accountable to one another.
  • The most common theme was motivation. Every person I asked said they felt highly motivated to achieve and exceed goals working with a strong leader.

Looking on the flipside of the coin, I think everyone has had a bad boss. One that creates an “us and them mentality”, a toxic working environment where people are constantly putting out spot fires rather than being protected from them.

The sad reality is many people feel they have worked under more weak leaders than strong ones and I wanted to question what they thought a weak leader was, and this was the result.

How would you describe a weak leader?

  • A weak leader is someone with a lack of call to action. Someone who identifies a flaw, or issue and fails to work to resolve it.
  • Weak leaders are ones that won’t get their hands dirty, they work from the safety of their office and refuse to get involved in the day-to-day activities of the staff.
  • Lack of understanding of each employee’s strengths and weaknesses.
  • Poor communication skills, negative and/or patronising tone either in private or in front of counterparts.
  • Someone who fails to see the big picture and obsesses over the minor details.
  • A weak leader can at times be hypocritical, highlighting mistakes that they often make themselves.

When I asked my colleagues how they felt their overall performance was impacted working under a weak leader, again, there was a common theme.

  • Many felt disengaged from the role and the organisation resulting in a lack of passion and belief in what they do.
  • They found themselves second guessing their work as guidance was lacking.
  • Everyone I asked said they felt highly unmotivated, uninspired to perform due to lack of respect and trust for their “leader” resulting poor in overall performance.
  • Some resigned.

Whether you’re an employee, leader or aspiring to be a leader I think everyone who reads this will relate to some parts of this blog. It never ceases to amaze me how commonly people are placed in positions of power and responsibility that are missing some of the most basic leadership qualities.

If you are a leader and can relate to the latter part of this blog I encourage you to re-strategise how you manage your people.

When you are leading a group of people, remember that they are people with opinions and views. These are the same people you need to be successful in order for you to be successful.

Not everyone possess natural leadership qualities, however if you put the needs of your employees and your company before your own, you will begin to form the basis of a strong and successful team.

 

Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide

Tags: Career | Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Cox Purtell Staffing Services | Jobs | Lead | Lead or Lose | Leader | Leadership | Recruiter | Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Specialist | Recruitment Sydney |

One thought on “Lead or Lose

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *