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  string(4267) "I have seen and heard an overwhelming amount of talk surrounding the art of selling yourself in the third person. This topic is becoming increasingly relevant, largely due to the increased use of LinkedIn.

Have you ever read a LinkedIn profile, cover letter or resume written in the third person and cringed? Me too!

Writing in the third person is rarely done on other social media platforms, but seems to be prevalent among many LinkedIn profiles. This leads to the obvious conclusion that writing in this manner is designed to ‘sell’ yourself to your audience, which would likely consist of:
  • Your current employer;
  • Past and present colleagues;
  • Clients;
  • Business connections; and
  • Prospective Employers / Recruiters / Headhunters.
Generally speaking, Facebook is a more personalised and informal social media platform. Perhaps people aren’t as afraid to be their ‘real self’ on Facebook, as friend lists consist mainly of family and friends. Maybe people don’t feel a need to self-promote as they would on LinkedIn. Don’t get me wrong, many people do self-promote on Facebook, just in a very different way. LinkedIn focuses on career achievements and history, whereas Facebook is a way for people to display their personal thoughts, events, and achievements. While it is important for job seekers professional networkers to find ways to stand out from the crowd and ‘be seen’, writing about your career achievements or goals in the third person is never the best way to do this. Career accounts written in the third person can project arrogance and an over-inflated ego. This writing style distances you from the reader as it sounds as though somebody else has written your sales spiel for you – not exactly what you would expect from a trustworthy, hard-worker! LinkedIn recommendations are a great way to showcase your achievements and hard work without a cringeworthy third person account of your achievements. These recommendations provide weight to your online credibility as they are from a fully contactable third party. Don’t be afraid to ask any of your previous clients or colleagues for recommendations – but always be courteous by checking first by phone or email, instead of just sending a bulk request through LinkedIn. Your contact will appreciate the personalised message and will be more likely to oblige. Your professional photo, job history, titles and duties will easily make up most of your LinkedIn profile. For the remaining portion, be your authentic self. While we can learn and from looking at the profiles of others, there is no need to copy or duplicate anyone else’s profile. It is important to note that copying and pasting portions of text from LinkedIn profiles onto your own is a violation of LinkedIn Copyright policy. Have a quick look over your LinkedIn profile right now. Many of us (myself included) fail to do this on a regular basis. Is your profile projecting authenticity and accountability? Or does it have a generic, distant third person account of your career? Christina Knock is the Brand & Digital Marketing Manager for Cox Purtell and thanks you for taking the time to read her blog. Connect with me on Twitter @ChristinaK_CP.     Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide" ["post_title"]=> string(55) "LinkedIn: Are You Selling Yourself In The Third Person?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(110) "Have you ever read a LinkedIn profile, cover letter or resume written in the third person and cringed? Me too!" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(53) "linkedin-are-you-selling-yourself-in-the-third-person" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(118) "http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/how-to-stand-out-in-the-crowd/ http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/art-self-promotion/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2015-07-24 16:07:13" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2015-07-24 06:07:13" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(40) "http://118.127.43.121/~coxpurtell/?p=659" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" }

I have seen and heard an overwhelming amount of talk surrounding the art of selling yourself in the third person. This topic is becoming increasingly relevant, largely due to the increased use of LinkedIn.

Have you ever read a LinkedIn profile, cover letter or resume written in the third person and cringed? Me too!

Writing in the third person is rarely done on other social media platforms, but seems to be prevalent among many LinkedIn profiles. This leads to the obvious conclusion that writing in this manner is designed to ‘sell’ yourself to your audience, which would likely consist of:

  • Your current employer;
  • Past and present colleagues;
  • Clients;
  • Business connections; and
  • Prospective Employers / Recruiters / Headhunters.

Generally speaking, Facebook is a more personalised and informal social media platform. Perhaps people aren’t as afraid to be their ‘real self’ on Facebook, as friend lists consist mainly of family and friends. Maybe people don’t feel a need to self-promote as they would on LinkedIn.

Don’t get me wrong, many people do self-promote on Facebook, just in a very different way. LinkedIn focuses on career achievements and history, whereas Facebook is a way for people to display their personal thoughts, events, and achievements.

While it is important for job seekers professional networkers to find ways to stand out from the crowd and ‘be seen’, writing about your career achievements or goals in the third person is never the best way to do this.

Career accounts written in the third person can project arrogance and an over-inflated ego. This writing style distances you from the reader as it sounds as though somebody else has written your sales spiel for you – not exactly what you would expect from a trustworthy, hard-worker!

LinkedIn recommendations are a great way to showcase your achievements and hard work without a cringeworthy third person account of your achievements. These recommendations provide weight to your online credibility as they are from a fully contactable third party. Don’t be afraid to ask any of your previous clients or colleagues for recommendations – but always be courteous by checking first by phone or email, instead of just sending a bulk request through LinkedIn. Your contact will appreciate the personalised message and will be more likely to oblige.

Your professional photo, job history, titles and duties will easily make up most of your LinkedIn profile. For the remaining portion, be your authentic self. While we can learn and from looking at the profiles of others, there is no need to copy or duplicate anyone else’s profile. It is important to note that copying and pasting portions of text from LinkedIn profiles onto your own is a violation of LinkedIn Copyright policy.

Have a quick look over your LinkedIn profile right now. Many of us (myself included) fail to do this on a regular basis. Is your profile projecting authenticity and accountability? Or does it have a generic, distant third person account of your career?

Christina Knock is the Brand & Digital Marketing Manager for Cox Purtell and thanks you for taking the time to read her blog.

Connect with me on Twitter @ChristinaK_CP.

 

 

Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide

Tags: Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | LinkedIn | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Melbourne | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney | Selling Yourself | Social Media | Temporary Recruitment | Third Person |

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