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  string(4155) "In today’s Australian society we often associate the concept of loyalty with ideas such as loyalty to our footy team or perhaps a loyalty programme such as our credit card or frequent flyer accounts, but how many of us are loyal to our employer?

The concept of loyalty, as defined as:

loyalty noun – the quality of being loyal. A strong feeling of support or allegiance.
eg; his extreme loyalty to the Crown. (Oxford, 2013).

Loyalty to one’s employer is a concept that, for many these days, has a finite timeframe. Each year approximately 17% of Australians on average change jobs. Those of us under 30 are twice as likely to change jobs as older Australians. (Watson, Prof. I, 2011).

The questions which arise are firstly, does a change of jobs increase the likelihood of a higher income? Sadly on average it does not.

Secondly, will a job change have a positive influence on job satisfaction? Watson says yes, this is the case. We are more likely to change jobs for a better situation, or even a perceived better boss, which will in turn increase our happiness at work.

Finally, there is no question as to whether productivity is increased with a job change: As we change jobs, we cross-skill and up-skill as we go, learning better ways to perform existing requirements and adapting to our new environment, while we learn new techniques on the job. There is also a significant increase in those who seek and complete higher education as they embark on a new role.

Loyalty, it seems, to one’s employer is out the window.

Not quite… Good employers, employers of choice, are implementing their own loyalty programmes. Some of these companies are utilising financial incentives to keep their employees happy. There are commission and bonus structures which most of us are working towards in some form, or other. These are tried and true methods of keeping employees loyal – often referred to as the “golden handcuffs”.

Smart employers, who really want to retain staff and grow their individual careers, are implementing more activity-based or experiential loyalty programmes. Reward for effort really does breed loyalty in the kind of employee who is likely to stay on past the 3-5 year mark.

Regular activities which stimulate productivity and yield instant gratification are clearly the most likely to inspire loyalty. This is a great double dip for those of us with an at risk up-side as part of our salary package. As productivity is increased, so are we more likely to over-achieve against our KPIs, while at the same time pocketing on the spot bonuses.

So how will you view your next sales drive or marketing day? Is it a chore to be avoided, or perhaps laughed at? Or, will you grab hold of an opportunity to have a bit of fun, while accelerating your earnings this quarter?

Loyalty to a pay check is one thing, but loyalty to an ethos is another. This is what makes a 3-5 year employee stay productive at a firm for more than 10 years. As Watson tells us, job satisfaction and happiness is the key to ensuring loyalty in long-term employees. Subscribing to a core set of values – and living those values – allows employees to belong to a team or corporate family with a feeling of comfort.

Without getting too “comfortable”, an employee who is being regularly challenged, rewarded and encouraged, while performing their role to a high ethical standard, will consistently outperform an employee who is merely paid well.

So, are you coin operated, or do you relish regular challenges while performing with honesty, integrity and respect? How you answer this question could go a long way to determining how loyal you really are.
  1. Oxford Dictionary of English 2nd Edition (Kindle Edition). Oxford Dictionaries; Soanes, Catherine. 2013. Oxford.
  2. Does changing your job leave you better off? A study of labour mobility in Australia, 2002 to 2008. Watson, Professor Ian. 2011. Macquarie University.
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In today’s Australian society we often associate the concept of loyalty with ideas such as loyalty to our footy team or perhaps a loyalty programme such as our credit card or frequent flyer accounts, but how many of us are loyal to our employer?

The concept of loyalty, as defined as:

loyalty noun – the quality of being loyal. A strong feeling of support or allegiance.
eg; his extreme loyalty to the Crown. (Oxford, 2013).

Loyalty to one’s employer is a concept that, for many these days, has a finite timeframe. Each year approximately 17% of Australians on average change jobs. Those of us under 30 are twice as likely to change jobs as older Australians. (Watson, Prof. I, 2011).

The questions which arise are firstly, does a change of jobs increase the likelihood of a higher income? Sadly on average it does not.

Secondly, will a job change have a positive influence on job satisfaction? Watson says yes, this is the case. We are more likely to change jobs for a better situation, or even a perceived better boss, which will in turn increase our happiness at work.

Finally, there is no question as to whether productivity is increased with a job change: As we change jobs, we cross-skill and up-skill as we go, learning better ways to perform existing requirements and adapting to our new environment, while we learn new techniques on the job. There is also a significant increase in those who seek and complete higher education as they embark on a new role.

Loyalty, it seems, to one’s employer is out the window.

Not quite… Good employers, employers of choice, are implementing their own loyalty programmes. Some of these companies are utilising financial incentives to keep their employees happy. There are commission and bonus structures which most of us are working towards in some form, or other. These are tried and true methods of keeping employees loyal – often referred to as the “golden handcuffs”.

Smart employers, who really want to retain staff and grow their individual careers, are implementing more activity-based or experiential loyalty programmes. Reward for effort really does breed loyalty in the kind of employee who is likely to stay on past the 3-5 year mark.

Regular activities which stimulate productivity and yield instant gratification are clearly the most likely to inspire loyalty. This is a great double dip for those of us with an at risk up-side as part of our salary package. As productivity is increased, so are we more likely to over-achieve against our KPIs, while at the same time pocketing on the spot bonuses.

So how will you view your next sales drive or marketing day? Is it a chore to be avoided, or perhaps laughed at? Or, will you grab hold of an opportunity to have a bit of fun, while accelerating your earnings this quarter?

Loyalty to a pay check is one thing, but loyalty to an ethos is another. This is what makes a 3-5 year employee stay productive at a firm for more than 10 years. As Watson tells us, job satisfaction and happiness is the key to ensuring loyalty in long-term employees. Subscribing to a core set of values – and living those values – allows employees to belong to a team or corporate family with a feeling of comfort.

Without getting too “comfortable”, an employee who is being regularly challenged, rewarded and encouraged, while performing their role to a high ethical standard, will consistently outperform an employee who is merely paid well.

So, are you coin operated, or do you relish regular challenges while performing with honesty, integrity and respect? How you answer this question could go a long way to determining how loyal you really are.

  1. Oxford Dictionary of English 2nd Edition (Kindle Edition). Oxford Dictionaries; Soanes, Catherine. 2013. Oxford.
  2. Does changing your job leave you better off? A study of labour mobility in Australia, 2002 to 2008. Watson, Professor Ian. 2011. Macquarie University.

 

Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide

Tags: Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Loyalty | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Melbourne | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney | Temporary Recruitment | Temps |

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