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  string(8485) "The University gates are closing and for some it’s the daunting experience of moving on to your first job outside of that part-time position down at the local admin office, or maybe Mum & Dads business on the weekends.

Your new role might just be a temporary summer job until you find that eye catching career, or maybe it’s the first day in that job you’ve always wanted.

You may be feeling nervous about starting this new job, and that’s completely normal. The transition from student to professional can be a rough one. In University, your time was clearly structured, and the expectations pretty easy to understand.

Now you have a supervisor, a team of co-workers, and a whole company relying on you and the work you do every day. If you mess up or flake out, you burden other people and can negatively affect a business and the lives of the people that business employs.

In addition to looking out for others, you still have your own future to consider. The economy continues to putter along, and the job market is highly competitive. If you’ve gotten a good job, you’re probably eager to hold onto it and move up in the world. Yet studies have shown that a quarter of new hires don’t make it even a year, and almost half get the axe within 18 months.

Despite the sobering statistics, if you keep a few things in mind, you’ll do just fine. Beyond that, you can be a great employee who adds value to not only the company, but to the people around you that you work with every day.

With that in mind, the first impression you make at your new job counts for a lot and can help set you up for future success.

How to Have a Stellar First Day

You probably won’t be tackling big projects right off the bat, so your new boss and co-workers won’t be able to evaluate your work yet. As Emily Bennington and Skip Lineberg, authors of Effective Immediately, put it, you’ll instead “be judged on some very visible, basic parameters,” such as:
  • Did you show up on time?
  • What are you wearing?
  • Do you display confidence and charisma?
  • Do you seem overwhelmed or ready for a challenge?
  • How well do you communicate?
  • What personal items did you put in your office?
Here’s how to be intentional about how you present yourself, ace this first basic set of criteria, and get your new job off on the best possible foot. Do your research Before you set foot inside your new workplace, you’ll want to have done as much research about your company and how it operates as possible. Google it up. This way you’ll avoid sticking your foot in your mouth about something right off the bat. The amount of information you can find about your new company is probably more than you would have thought. Get at it! Set out what you need the night before The last thing you want to do is be late for your first day on the job, so make your morning routine and departure as smooth as possible by preparing the night before. Make sure your shirt is ironed and shoes are shined. Lay out what you’re going to wear. Brush up on your business etiquette Business etiquette varies somewhat from social etiquette, and if you’ve only worked in food service or as a lifeguard thus far in your life, you’ll want to avoid rubbing people the wrong way. A quick note on mobile phone etiquette Most places of business these days allow mobile phone use, and many rely on it. On your first day, keep it in your pocket, and off. You’ll probably have Mum, Grandma, and your favorite other half texting or calling to wish you luck. As time goes on, it’s more appropriate to glance at your phone or have it on your desk, but keep it tucked away when you first start. Dress for success When you meet your co-workers for the first time, they won’t have much to go on in sizing you up, and will look to what you’re wearing for clues to your personality (don’t judge them, you do it too). That’s why what you wear is such a big part of the first impression you make. You don’t want to dress in a way that makes you stand out – either too casually or too formally. If you got a glimpse of your co-workers when you were interviewed, that will have given you a clue to what the standard is. If you don’t have any idea, email your supervisor or HR person a few days before to ask what people usually wear. Aim to arrive ten minutes early Again, you absolutely don’t want to be late on your first day. It can be a good idea to do a “dry run” of your commute in the week before your start day, especially if you’ll be taking public transportation. That way you’ll feel more comfortable about where you’re going and how long it takes to get there. Make sure to do your trial run at the same time you’ll actually be setting off on your first day of work in order to duplicate traffic conditions. Carry yourself with confidence You’re probably going to be nervous, but try to give off a relaxed and confident air. Think to yourself that in a competitive job market, you landed this position; you’ve got what it takes to succeed if you apply yourself and have a lot to offer. We know that even when we don’t feel a certain way, if we act like we do, our brains will catch up with our behavior; so act calm and collected, and you’ll soon feel that way too. Take the initiative to introduce yourself Your supervisor or boss may take you around to meet your new co-workers, but even if they do, they probably won’t introduce you to everyone. So take the initiative in meeting others yourself. Don’t put the onus on your co-workers; remember, you’re coming into their territory, not the other way around. One of the keys to success in your new job will be networking with others, building trust with your co-workers, and learning how to operate as a team – and that starts on the very first day. It will never be easier to introduce yourself than it is now, as you’ve got a built-in opening line: “Hi, I’m ____, the new____.” You don’t have to have a long or deep conversation with your co-workers – they probably have plenty to do. But ask them things like what they do in their position and how long they’ve been on the job. Use what they have displayed in their office/cubicle as easy small talk fodder: “Are those your kids?” “Are you a big Football fan?” Take notes From loads of new names to where certain files are located, people are going to be dumping a whole lot of information on you from the word go. And it’s going to come in a rapid-fire, stream-of-consciousness way that’s not always going to be well-organised or easy to follow; a co-worker will add new tidbits each time they see something that reminds them of something to tell you. So carry a pocket notebook with you wherever you go and take copious notes. These notes will be invaluable to you later, and keep you from having to ask as many questions (not that questions are bad – see below – but the less you can interrupt people, the better). Also be sure to take notes on names and roles, and study them. Being able to recite people’s names right off the bat is an excellent way to build rapport. So what happens if you’ve been at your job for a little while, and you feel like you’ve already screwed up on a few of these points? Fear not! You can change your ways any day you decide to. If you haven’t met all your co-workers, there’s no better time than now. “You know, I can’t believe I haven’t had the chance to meet you yet, my name is _____.” Been struggling with keeping your tasks organised? Bring a notebook in tomorrow and get on track. Be encouraged that it’s easier to right the ship with a job than it is many other things in life. Start working hard tomorrow, and you’ll be set in no time.   Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide" ["post_title"]=> string(21) "Master Your First Day" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(151) "You may be feeling nervous about starting this new job, and that’s completely normal. The transition from student to professional can be a rough one." 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The University gates are closing and for some it’s the daunting experience of moving on to your first job outside of that part-time position down at the local admin office, or maybe Mum & Dads business on the weekends.

Your new role might just be a temporary summer job until you find that eye catching career, or maybe it’s the first day in that job you’ve always wanted.

You may be feeling nervous about starting this new job, and that’s completely normal. The transition from student to professional can be a rough one. In University, your time was clearly structured, and the expectations pretty easy to understand.

Now you have a supervisor, a team of co-workers, and a whole company relying on you and the work you do every day. If you mess up or flake out, you burden other people and can negatively affect a business and the lives of the people that business employs.

In addition to looking out for others, you still have your own future to consider. The economy continues to putter along, and the job market is highly competitive. If you’ve gotten a good job, you’re probably eager to hold onto it and move up in the world. Yet studies have shown that a quarter of new hires don’t make it even a year, and almost half get the axe within 18 months.

Despite the sobering statistics, if you keep a few things in mind, you’ll do just fine. Beyond that, you can be a great employee who adds value to not only the company, but to the people around you that you work with every day.

With that in mind, the first impression you make at your new job counts for a lot and can help set you up for future success.

How to Have a Stellar First Day

You probably won’t be tackling big projects right off the bat, so your new boss and co-workers won’t be able to evaluate your work yet. As Emily Bennington and Skip Lineberg, authors of Effective Immediately, put it, you’ll instead “be judged on some very visible, basic parameters,” such as:

  • Did you show up on time?
  • What are you wearing?
  • Do you display confidence and charisma?
  • Do you seem overwhelmed or ready for a challenge?
  • How well do you communicate?
  • What personal items did you put in your office?

Here’s how to be intentional about how you present yourself, ace this first basic set of criteria, and get your new job off on the best possible foot.

Do your research

Before you set foot inside your new workplace, you’ll want to have done as much research about your company and how it operates as possible. Google it up. This way you’ll avoid sticking your foot in your mouth about something right off the bat. The amount of information you can find about your new company is probably more than you would have thought. Get at it!

Set out what you need the night before

The last thing you want to do is be late for your first day on the job, so make your morning routine and departure as smooth as possible by preparing the night before. Make sure your shirt is ironed and shoes are shined. Lay out what you’re going to wear.

Brush up on your business etiquette

Business etiquette varies somewhat from social etiquette, and if you’ve only worked in food service or as a lifeguard thus far in your life, you’ll want to avoid rubbing people the wrong way.

A quick note on mobile phone etiquette

Most places of business these days allow mobile phone use, and many rely on it. On your first day, keep it in your pocket, and off. You’ll probably have Mum, Grandma, and your favorite other half texting or calling to wish you luck. As time goes on, it’s more appropriate to glance at your phone or have it on your desk, but keep it tucked away when you first start.

Dress for success

When you meet your co-workers for the first time, they won’t have much to go on in sizing you up, and will look to what you’re wearing for clues to your personality (don’t judge them, you do it too). That’s why what you wear is such a big part of the first impression you make. You don’t want to dress in a way that makes you stand out – either too casually or too formally.

If you got a glimpse of your co-workers when you were interviewed, that will have given you a clue to what the standard is. If you don’t have any idea, email your supervisor or HR person a few days before to ask what people usually wear.

Aim to arrive ten minutes early

Again, you absolutely don’t want to be late on your first day. It can be a good idea to do a “dry run” of your commute in the week before your start day, especially if you’ll be taking public transportation. That way you’ll feel more comfortable about where you’re going and how long it takes to get there. Make sure to do your trial run at the same time you’ll actually be setting off on your first day of work in order to duplicate traffic conditions.

Carry yourself with confidence

You’re probably going to be nervous, but try to give off a relaxed and confident air. Think to yourself that in a competitive job market, you landed this position; you’ve got what it takes to succeed if you apply yourself and have a lot to offer. We know that even when we don’t feel a certain way, if we act like we do, our brains will catch up with our behavior; so act calm and collected, and you’ll soon feel that way too.

Take the initiative to introduce yourself

Your supervisor or boss may take you around to meet your new co-workers, but even if they do, they probably won’t introduce you to everyone. So take the initiative in meeting others yourself. Don’t put the onus on your co-workers; remember, you’re coming into their territory, not the other way around. One of the keys to success in your new job will be networking with others, building trust with your co-workers, and learning how to operate as a team – and that starts on the very first day.

It will never be easier to introduce yourself than it is now, as you’ve got a built-in opening line: “Hi, I’m ____, the new____.” You don’t have to have a long or deep conversation with your co-workers – they probably have plenty to do. But ask them things like what they do in their position and how long they’ve been on the job. Use what they have displayed in their office/cubicle as easy small talk fodder: “Are those your kids?” “Are you a big Football fan?”

Take notes

From loads of new names to where certain files are located, people are going to be dumping a whole lot of information on you from the word go. And it’s going to come in a rapid-fire, stream-of-consciousness way that’s not always going to be well-organised or easy to follow; a co-worker will add new tidbits each time they see something that reminds them of something to tell you. So carry a pocket notebook with you wherever you go and take copious notes.

These notes will be invaluable to you later, and keep you from having to ask as many questions (not that questions are bad – see below – but the less you can interrupt people, the better). Also be sure to take notes on names and roles, and study them. Being able to recite people’s names right off the bat is an excellent way to build rapport.

So what happens if you’ve been at your job for a little while, and you feel like you’ve already screwed up on a few of these points? Fear not! You can change your ways any day you decide to. If you haven’t met all your co-workers, there’s no better time than now. “You know, I can’t believe I haven’t had the chance to meet you yet, my name is _____.”

Been struggling with keeping your tasks organised? Bring a notebook in tomorrow and get on track. Be encouraged that it’s easier to right the ship with a job than it is many other things in life. Start working hard tomorrow, and you’ll be set in no time.

 

Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide

Tags: Cox Purtell Blog | Cox Purtell Staffing Services | first day | Job | Recruiter | Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney |

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