object(WP_Post)#6158 (24) {
  ["ID"]=>
  int(1767)
  ["post_author"]=>
  string(1) "5"
  ["post_date"]=>
  string(19) "2014-12-02 00:59:06"
  ["post_date_gmt"]=>
  string(19) "2014-12-02 00:59:06"
  ["post_content"]=>
  string(4604) "A few weeks ago I attended a breakfast event that was hosted by one of our suppliers/business partners. It was an excellent event based around some interesting topics. The guest list was impressive, filled with successful, entrepreneurial industry leaders. It was a privilege to be there.

So there we all were sitting down at the table after some pre breakfast chit chat and catching up. The host set the tone and explained how we could get the most out of the breakfast through the subject matter experts that were in attendance to hear our questions and to give us some advice, assistance and strategies that we could potentially use.

The conversation was flowing. The guests were respectful, inquisitive and humble, open with their thoughts, ideas and concerns. There were some great insights and some open and frank conversations.

It was all moving along swimmingly when out of the blue the conversation was derailed by one of the guests.  Now they not only were discussing an issue that was totally off the purpose of the event but it was inflammatory and really placed the hosts in a very awkward position. Several of the other guests tried valiantly to get the conversation back on track but to no avail.

Ultimately the host ended up taking a pretty firm line with the guest but at that point the jig was up. The event wrapped up pretty quickly after that as everyone had been disconnected from the discussions. On my way back to the office I was thinking about the events of the morning and wondering how such an experienced person could get it so badly wrong.

When I arrived back in the office I did a search for articles, blogs, infographics on etiquette at meetings. There were plenty out there and after reading a few the one thing I noticed was that none of the “experts” were advising people to mind their manners! Maybe they just assume that in business everyone has a certain level of behaviour?

So to add to the list of available materials out there here is my guide to attending work functions:
  1. Be prepared: Make sure you know the topic and agenda for the event so you can make a valuable contribution.
  2. Be on time: In my book being on time is being 5 minutes early. There is plenty of press out there about people being constantly late for meetings / events it is not acceptable.
  3. Agenda: Stick to the meeting agenda. Everyone is there for a reason and they will not benefit from off topic conversations.
  4. Speaking: Keep the meeting organised by only speaking when you have the floor. Ask questions during the designated question period, do not interrupt someone while they are speaking or asking a question. Common sense right?
  5. Listen: You may find that many of the questions you have about a topic are answered by the content of the meeting. Listen attentively to the meeting and take notes.
  6. Technology: Turn off your mobile phone prior to the start of the meeting. If you are expecting an urgent call, then set your phone to vibrate and excuse yourself from the meeting if the call comes in.
  7. Body Language: If it’s a sit-down meeting, you need to sit upright, no slouching. Sitting upright helps with maintaining attention and also when you are speaking it helps your voice projection.
  8. Good manners: Don’t insult your host or put them in an awkward situation. You are their guest accepting their hospitality. Apart from being rude it is also disruptive. If you had a dinner party at your home you would not expect your guests to raise issues that are confronting and / or incendiary.
  9. Be gracious: Say thank you when you are leaving and follow up with a note / email when you get back to your office. After all it is nice to be nice!
So hopefully if you can stick to these basic rules and let’s face it they are all common sense you should be a great guest and you will probably find that you will get more invites too!  " ["post_title"]=> string(17) "Mind Your Manners" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(99) "To add to the list of available materials out there here is my guide to attending work functions..." ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["ping_status"]=> string(4) "open" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(12) "mind-manners" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(123) "http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/i-hear-ya-but-im-not-listening/ http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/lets-get-physiological/" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2017-08-24 15:55:14" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2017-08-24 05:55:14" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(36) "http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/?p=1767" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" }

A few weeks ago I attended a breakfast event that was hosted by one of our suppliers/business partners. It was an excellent event based around some interesting topics. The guest list was impressive, filled with successful, entrepreneurial industry leaders. It was a privilege to be there.

So there we all were sitting down at the table after some pre breakfast chit chat and catching up. The host set the tone and explained how we could get the most out of the breakfast through the subject matter experts that were in attendance to hear our questions and to give us some advice, assistance and strategies that we could potentially use.

The conversation was flowing. The guests were respectful, inquisitive and humble, open with their thoughts, ideas and concerns. There were some great insights and some open and frank conversations.

It was all moving along swimmingly when out of the blue the conversation was derailed by one of the guests.  Now they not only were discussing an issue that was totally off the purpose of the event but it was inflammatory and really placed the hosts in a very awkward position. Several of the other guests tried valiantly to get the conversation back on track but to no avail.

Ultimately the host ended up taking a pretty firm line with the guest but at that point the jig was up. The event wrapped up pretty quickly after that as everyone had been disconnected from the discussions. On my way back to the office I was thinking about the events of the morning and wondering how such an experienced person could get it so badly wrong.

When I arrived back in the office I did a search for articles, blogs, infographics on etiquette at meetings. There were plenty out there and after reading a few the one thing I noticed was that none of the “experts” were advising people to mind their manners! Maybe they just assume that in business everyone has a certain level of behaviour?

So to add to the list of available materials out there here is my guide to attending work functions:

  1. Be prepared: Make sure you know the topic and agenda for the event so you can make a valuable contribution.
  2. Be on time: In my book being on time is being 5 minutes early. There is plenty of press out there about people being constantly late for meetings / events it is not acceptable.
  3. Agenda: Stick to the meeting agenda. Everyone is there for a reason and they will not benefit from off topic conversations.
  4. Speaking: Keep the meeting organised by only speaking when you have the floor. Ask questions during the designated question period, do not interrupt someone while they are speaking or asking a question. Common sense right?
  5. Listen: You may find that many of the questions you have about a topic are answered by the content of the meeting. Listen attentively to the meeting and take notes.
  6. Technology: Turn off your mobile phone prior to the start of the meeting. If you are expecting an urgent call, then set your phone to vibrate and excuse yourself from the meeting if the call comes in.
  7. Body Language: If it’s a sit-down meeting, you need to sit upright, no slouching. Sitting upright helps with maintaining attention and also when you are speaking it helps your voice projection.
  8. Good manners: Don’t insult your host or put them in an awkward situation. You are their guest accepting their hospitality. Apart from being rude it is also disruptive. If you had a dinner party at your home you would not expect your guests to raise issues that are confronting and / or incendiary.
  9. Be gracious: Say thank you when you are leaving and follow up with a note / email when you get back to your office. After all it is nice to be nice!

So hopefully if you can stick to these basic rules and let’s face it they are all common sense you should be a great guest and you will probably find that you will get more invites too!

 

Tags: Career | Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Etiquette | Manners | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Melbourne | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney | Temporary Recruitment |

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