object(WP_Post)#6145 (24) {
  ["ID"]=>
  int(18962)
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  string(19) "2017-06-26 13:47:19"
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  string(19) "2017-06-26 03:47:19"
  ["post_content"]=>
  string(2450) "In my role, I get to meet a lot of recruiters. I’ve also worked with many over the years.

If there’s one pattern that has emerged it’s that the key to success in recruitment is tenure. It’s extremely rare that even an experienced Consultant can be consistently successful, in terms of billings, in their first year of recruitment in a company. Let alone a rookie Consultant. Unless, of course, your bar for success is low! 

There are a disappointingly large number of Consultants with multiple stints of around one year. If you’ve ever interviewed these Consultants, you’ll find that there is rarely a bad explanation for the constant movement. The reasons can usually be bunched like this: Culture Change, Commission Change, Manager Change. I say bullsh*t.

Whilst this might explain one short stint – let’s face it, if it’s happened 2, 3, 4 or more times then you probably need to start looking at what the common factor is (hint: it’s not them…).

What do I Look for? Well, I think recruitment is one of the hardest jobs to be really good at. No single part appears difficult but putting it all together proves to be for many. For me, tenure of at least 2 years in a recruitment role demonstrates that you had some grit to stick it out – the first year is definitely the hardest.

But how should you go about doing it?

1. Avoid Politics

In a performance environment like recruitment, there’ll often be colleagues who may be facing their own challenges. Support them, don’t drag them down or be dragged down.

2. Be Consistent

As mentioned above, the individual parts of recruitment aren’t that hard but it’s critical that you do all the key activities consistently, every day, every week, every month.

3. Commit

Recruitment can be a seriously rewarding career both financially and personally but that doesn’t happen if you treat it as a 9-5 job.

It’s not a job – it’s a career.

The key to success in recruitment is tenure.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this! Please reply in the comments section below or Tweet me @JamesPurtellCP."
  ["post_title"]=>
  string(45) "Recruiters: Should You Stay or Should You Go?"
  ["post_excerpt"]=>
  string(191) "In my role, I get to meet a lot of recruiters. I’ve also worked with many over the years. If there’s one pattern that has emerged it’s that the key to success in recruitment is tenure. "
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  ["pinged"]=>
  string(158) "http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/2015-year-one-more/
http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/the-importance-of-being-passionate-in-recruitment-and-life-in-general/"
  ["post_modified"]=>
  string(19) "2017-06-27 10:06:47"
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In my role, I get to meet a lot of recruiters. I’ve also worked with many over the years.

If there’s one pattern that has emerged it’s that the key to success in recruitment is tenure. It’s extremely rare that even an experienced Consultant can be consistently successful, in terms of billings, in their first year of recruitment in a company. Let alone a rookie Consultant. Unless, of course, your bar for success is low!

There are a disappointingly large number of Consultants with multiple stints of around one year. If you’ve ever interviewed these Consultants, you’ll find that there is rarely a bad explanation for the constant movement. The reasons can usually be bunched like this: Culture Change, Commission Change, Manager Change. I say bullsh*t.

Whilst this might explain one short stint – let’s face it, if it’s happened 2, 3, 4 or more times then you probably need to start looking at what the common factor is (hint: it’s not them…).

What do I Look for? Well, I think recruitment is one of the hardest jobs to be really good at. No single part appears difficult but putting it all together proves to be for many. For me, tenure of at least 2 years in a recruitment role demonstrates that you had some grit to stick it out – the first year is definitely the hardest.

But how should you go about doing it?

1. Avoid Politics

In a performance environment like recruitment, there’ll often be colleagues who may be facing their own challenges. Support them, don’t drag them down or be dragged down.

2. Be Consistent

As mentioned above, the individual parts of recruitment aren’t that hard but it’s critical that you do all the key activities consistently, every day, every week, every month.

3. Commit

Recruitment can be a seriously rewarding career both financially and personally but that doesn’t happen if you treat it as a 9-5 job.

It’s not a job – it’s a career.

The key to success in recruitment is tenure.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this! Please reply in the comments section below or Tweet me @JamesPurtellCP.

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