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  string(4815) "The world can be a confusing place for a recruiter.

It seems that you can’t pick up a resume these days without seeing that increasingly pervasive word “digital” emblazoned across every second job title.

Digital Strategist, Digital Content Creator, Digital Media Consultant, Head of Strategic Digital Direction… The list goes on, and while that last title may be a slight exaggeration, the word “digital” is increasingly becoming the “go to” word to describe “I do things on the internet”.

And nowhere is this trend more evident, in my experience, than in the world of marketing.

So what is the difference between a “Marketer” and a “Digital Marketer” in this increasingly digitalised age where almost everything happens on the Internet anyway? Can just anyone call themselves a digital marketer if they operate online, or does it require a completely different approach?

Below are some of my thoughts on the key differences.

Mediums

This one may seem a bit of a no-brainer, but it’s an important distinction to make from the outset.

A primary difference between the two streams of marketing is that a traditional marketer uses tangible items to brand a product or logo, while a digital marketer does so strictly in the online space.

In practice, tangible items might include brochures, billboards, print ads in newspapers or magazines, business cards, posters, commercials on TV and radio. Intangible online mediums, on the other hand, might include websites, social media, YouTube videos, and banner ads, to name a few. These are all inbound tactics that seek to induce consumers to your brand in online searches for related products or industries, and as such can feel a little less “forced”.

However just being online doesn’t make you a digital marketing expert.

To be truly effective, digital marketers now need to integrate their efforts with other communications fields – such as public relations – due to the pervasiveness of the news media in social media and other online activity. This can also add an injection of credibility to your brand’s online presence due to the objective nature of news media, and the opportunities it provides for your company to be spoken about favourably by a third party.

The lesson here? Integration with other communications streams and third party comment is crucial – traditional marketing spiels won’t cut it alone.

AdWords, Key Words, SEO…

Most marketers understand that the strategic use of the English language is a must have skill whether operating in the digital space or otherwise. However, what this looks like in practice will look very different depending on the platform at hand.

For the digital marketer this is especially important, due to the plethora of online platforms and their very different content requirements. Your 800-word marketing brochure is no longer appropriate in the 140-character limit of Twitter. Subheadings in blogs now rule due to our shorter attention spans, and the bonus points they’re given by the Google algorithm.

“Click bait” is now very much a “thing” and cannot be ignored – but must be followed by a high quality article that doesn’t just produce clicks for the sake of clicks. It’s a fine line to tread, but one the digital marketer must be willing to brave!

The lesson here? Tailor, tailor, tailor your content. Every medium requires a different approach – and there are a LOT of different mediums.

Measurability

There are clear benefits to traditional marketing, such as audience familiarity with its different platforms. But one key area where it comes up lacking is in the area of measurability.

Digital efforts, on the other hand, are almost perfectly measurable to the point that there is now an overabundance of tools and KPIs that might be used to determine the effectiveness of any online marketing campaigns.

The lesson here? If you call yourself a digital marketer, you’d better be extremely familiar with the range of tools available to measure success – and also which KPIs are most important to your firm when defining what “success” looks like in the first place."
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  string(39) "So You Think You're A Digital Marketer?"
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  string(157) "It seems that you can’t pick up a resume these days without seeing that increasingly pervasive word “digital” emblazoned across every second job title."
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http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/the-social-future/"
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The world can be a confusing place for a recruiter.

It seems that you can’t pick up a resume these days without seeing that increasingly pervasive word “digital” emblazoned across every second job title.

Digital Strategist, Digital Content Creator, Digital Media Consultant, Head of Strategic Digital Direction… The list goes on, and while that last title may be a slight exaggeration, the word “digital” is increasingly becoming the “go to” word to describe “I do things on the internet”.

And nowhere is this trend more evident, in my experience, than in the world of marketing.

So what is the difference between a “Marketer” and a “Digital Marketer” in this increasingly digitalised age where almost everything happens on the Internet anyway? Can just anyone call themselves a digital marketer if they operate online, or does it require a completely different approach?

Below are some of my thoughts on the key differences.

Mediums

This one may seem a bit of a no-brainer, but it’s an important distinction to make from the outset.

A primary difference between the two streams of marketing is that a traditional marketer uses tangible items to brand a product or logo, while a digital marketer does so strictly in the online space.

In practice, tangible items might include brochures, billboards, print ads in newspapers or magazines, business cards, posters, commercials on TV and radio. Intangible online mediums, on the other hand, might include websites, social media, YouTube videos, and banner ads, to name a few. These are all inbound tactics that seek to induce consumers to your brand in online searches for related products or industries, and as such can feel a little less “forced”.

However just being online doesn’t make you a digital marketing expert.

To be truly effective, digital marketers now need to integrate their efforts with other communications fields – such as public relations – due to the pervasiveness of the news media in social media and other online activity. This can also add an injection of credibility to your brand’s online presence due to the objective nature of news media, and the opportunities it provides for your company to be spoken about favourably by a third party.

The lesson here? Integration with other communications streams and third party comment is crucial – traditional marketing spiels won’t cut it alone.

AdWords, Key Words, SEO…

Most marketers understand that the strategic use of the English language is a must have skill whether operating in the digital space or otherwise. However, what this looks like in practice will look very different depending on the platform at hand.

For the digital marketer this is especially important, due to the plethora of online platforms and their very different content requirements. Your 800-word marketing brochure is no longer appropriate in the 140-character limit of Twitter. Subheadings in blogs now rule due to our shorter attention spans, and the bonus points they’re given by the Google algorithm.

Click bait” is now very much a “thing” and cannot be ignored – but must be followed by a high quality article that doesn’t just produce clicks for the sake of clicks. It’s a fine line to tread, but one the digital marketer must be willing to brave!

The lesson here? Tailor, tailor, tailor your content. Every medium requires a different approach – and there are a LOT of different mediums.

Measurability

There are clear benefits to traditional marketing, such as audience familiarity with its different platforms. But one key area where it comes up lacking is in the area of measurability.

Digital efforts, on the other hand, are almost perfectly measurable to the point that there is now an overabundance of tools and KPIs that might be used to determine the effectiveness of any online marketing campaigns.

The lesson here? If you call yourself a digital marketer, you’d better be extremely familiar with the range of tools available to measure success – and also which KPIs are most important to your firm when defining what “success” looks like in the first place.

Tags: Career | Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Digital | Digital Marketing | Marketing | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Sydney | Resume | Social Media | Temporary Recruitment | Temps |

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