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  string(19) "2015-08-24 12:58:22"
  ["post_date_gmt"]=>
  string(19) "2015-08-24 02:58:22"
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  string(2455) "I walked past a fast food restaurant just a few days ago and noticed a big screen which allowed you to order your calorific food.

Standing approximately 5 feet behind that screen, I could see 2 innocent humans eagerly waiting behind a counter. It made me sad.

I then walked to my bank to deposit some cash, I was greeted by a very pleasant Customer Service Assistant who asked me if I knew how to use the machine to deposit my cash in an even quicker and more efficient way than using the smiling Teller.

I later found out that that lovely customer service assistant is actually KPI’d on how many people she takes to that machine instead of a human!

Later that day when I arrived at a client meeting, I was directed by a sign on the wall to use the computer in front of me to sign in. This well programmed computer sent an email to my host to let them know I had arrived, although it didn’t tell me how long I would be waiting afterwards!

You get where I am going with this.

I have to note that I clearly understand that we live in a fast moving, ever growing and competitive world. Often it is the consumer that is demanding quicker, faster and easier ways of doing things.

BUT, some of these instances such as the ones I have noted above are, to me, an exploitation to our hardworking human race who are seemingly under pressure to make their offering extinct.

We joke a lot in recruitment about quirky names for standardised roles such as Director of First Impressions instead of Receptionist. The real joke is on us because truly, that is exactly what they are.

Organisations spend a fair amount of money on branding and communication – surely this human should come into that budget? They are there to create the look and feel of the firm, they ensure your customers feel listened to and looked after.

From a consumer perspective, I thoroughly enjoy interacting with humans every day. You can learn a lot from people if you let them teach you. People brighten my day and give me something to talk about when I get home that evening.

Is this trend toward automation and technology really necessary? Or is this just old fashioned cost-cutting and greed in most instances?

Bring back the human I say! What are your thoughts on automation and computerisation in our everyday lives?

 "
  ["post_title"]=>
  string(15) "The Human Touch"
  ["post_excerpt"]=>
  string(136) "Is this trend toward automation and technology really necessary? Or is this just old fashioned cost-cutting and greed in most instances?"
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http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/the-social-future/"
  ["post_modified"]=>
  string(19) "2016-12-15 15:33:44"
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I walked past a fast food restaurant just a few days ago and noticed a big screen which allowed you to order your calorific food.

Standing approximately 5 feet behind that screen, I could see 2 innocent humans eagerly waiting behind a counter. It made me sad.

I then walked to my bank to deposit some cash, I was greeted by a very pleasant Customer Service Assistant who asked me if I knew how to use the machine to deposit my cash in an even quicker and more efficient way than using the smiling Teller.

I later found out that that lovely customer service assistant is actually KPI’d on how many people she takes to that machine instead of a human!

Later that day when I arrived at a client meeting, I was directed by a sign on the wall to use the computer in front of me to sign in. This well programmed computer sent an email to my host to let them know I had arrived, although it didn’t tell me how long I would be waiting afterwards!

You get where I am going with this.

I have to note that I clearly understand that we live in a fast moving, ever growing and competitive world. Often it is the consumer that is demanding quicker, faster and easier ways of doing things.

BUT, some of these instances such as the ones I have noted above are, to me, an exploitation to our hardworking human race who are seemingly under pressure to make their offering extinct.

We joke a lot in recruitment about quirky names for standardised roles such as Director of First Impressions instead of Receptionist. The real joke is on us because truly, that is exactly what they are.

Organisations spend a fair amount of money on branding and communication – surely this human should come into that budget? They are there to create the look and feel of the firm, they ensure your customers feel listened to and looked after.

From a consumer perspective, I thoroughly enjoy interacting with humans every day. You can learn a lot from people if you let them teach you. People brighten my day and give me something to talk about when I get home that evening.

Is this trend toward automation and technology really necessary? Or is this just old fashioned cost-cutting and greed in most instances?

Bring back the human I say! What are your thoughts on automation and computerisation in our everyday lives?

 

Tags: Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Interview Tips | Job Interview | Permanent Recruitment | Professional Development | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Sydney | Technology | Temporary Recruitment |

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