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  string(7260) "About a year ago I came across this book The Four Agreements by Miguel Ángel Ruiz. Quite often I read or listen to personal development material – some of it great, some not so great, some just woeful.

In this book I found that rare mixture – practical, accessible, and easily applicable to pretty much anyone’s circumstances. So, to put it to the test I thought I’d apply it to the job search.

The First Principle

You should be impeccable with your word. Your word is not just the words you say, but the thoughts you have and the actions you take. Being impeccable with this means that you do not trash talk yourself or others; and that you say what you mean, and do as you say you will. In other words, when looking for a new job, be clear about what you want, and truthful about what you have to offer.

Follow through on what you say you will do and don’t commit to interviews or being put forward to jobs to which you’re not fully committed. It should go without saying, but don’t slag off former employers or colleagues.

A good recruiter will have ways and means of finding the disparities between what you say and how you behave. But even if you don’t slip up in interview, your true nature will eventually and inevitably become apparent, and you will have damaged your own personal brand.

If you apply the principle of being impeccable with your word you will be focused in your job search, because you will want to put the right actions and words into it.

You won’t scatter gun applications to every job out there, because you will want to put the right focus into the ones that you really want and in which you can perform well. In turn, people will see you as someone who behaves with integrity and follows through on what they say they will do.

The Second Principle 

Don't take anything done by others personally, because nothing others do is because of you. What others say and do is a projection of their own reality.

If you are met with a bad attitude or a rude response, remember that this is the other person’s reaction to their perceptions. Equally this applies if you are met with praise. For instance, you want to quit your job because you have found something better. You go to your current boss and they offer you the sun moon and stars for you to stay.

You start to feel pretty indispensable and think you can get a better deal. But what is really going on? Are you really that indispensable? Did the department and your role exist before you came along? Is it really that your current boss hates to have to recruit, and so will say anything right now to avoid the pain that they perceive in replacing you? In other words, it is likely to be much more about avoiding pain for themselves, than it is about holding on to you.

The Third Principle

Don’t make assumptions. That old cliché – when you assume you make an ass out of me and you. A cliché generally becomes a cliché because it is true.

Don’t assume that you are right or wrong for a job, or that a particular role is right or wrong for you – ask questions, find out as much as possible, be open to possibilities. Find the courage to ask questions and to express what you really want. Communicate with others as clearly as you can to avoid misunderstandings.

Also don’t make the assumption that if you want something you can’t have it – find out what the competencies are, and match these. Don’t assume you know what anyone else is thinking or feeling.

Recently I had a candidate say to me that she was thinking about changing her name, because she thought that the fact that she had an Asian name was thwarting her job search. She assumed that recruiters and prospective employers were making assumptions. While this is possible, it is a failure on both the recruiter and candidate’s side – who could ever assume the capabilities of a person based on their name alone?

You may have had what you thought to be a great interview, and that you have it in the bag. However, if you quell that excitement and remember to ask a question before you leave, such as is there are any concerns you have about me, or any other questions, you will find out what the interviewer is really thinking. You will be able to mitigate any doubts they have. Don’t make the assumption that the interviewer is just as excited about you as you are about the job.

The Fourth Principle 

Always do your best. No matter how well or badly you perceive yourself to have performed in a given situation, believe that you did your best at that point in time. If you did well then great, no problem. But if you are walking away from the situation thinking “I messed that up” you are likely to beat yourself up about it.

In this instance the approach to take is that you did the best you could with the circumstances you were in, learn what held you back and prepare for this the next time. This will avoid you beating yourself up unnecessarily (and fruitlessly).

Where we feel guilty about actions we have taken, it normally does not help us to move on. Accept that you did the best you could at the time, and you will clear guilt away and be able to focus on how to work the situation to your advantage next time.

Maybe you’ve had a bad interview. You woke up late, you rushed out the door forgetting the notes you had prepared, you got stuck in traffic and instead of being the 15 minutes early you wanted to be you arrived right in time to walk into the interview, flustered and out of breath. Not a great first impression; and things got worse from there.

If you can walk away from that and take the lessons from it – preparation, ensuring you woke on time or left early enough to avoid traffic, and then let go of the disappointment you will be better able to prepare well the next time and not waste energy on guilt, embarrassment or self flagellation. Forgive yourself, and move forward from that situation, knowing that you did your best and that next time, you will do even better.

Apply the principles behind the four agreements as a starting point to your job search and see where else they work for you. Life is a constant challenge and trying a different approach when you get stuck is essential. These principles might not change your life overnight, but applying them is sure to at least change your outlook.

 

Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide"
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  string(41) "The Principles Behind the Four Agreements"
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  string(142) "Within the Four Agreements I found that rare mixture – practical, accessible, and easily applicable to pretty much anyone’s circumstances."
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About a year ago I came across this book The Four Agreements by Miguel Ángel Ruiz. Quite often I read or listen to personal development material – some of it great, some not so great, some just woeful.

In this book I found that rare mixture – practical, accessible, and easily applicable to pretty much anyone’s circumstances. So, to put it to the test I thought I’d apply it to the job search.

The First Principle

You should be impeccable with your word. Your word is not just the words you say, but the thoughts you have and the actions you take. Being impeccable with this means that you do not trash talk yourself or others; and that you say what you mean, and do as you say you will. In other words, when looking for a new job, be clear about what you want, and truthful about what you have to offer.

Follow through on what you say you will do and don’t commit to interviews or being put forward to jobs to which you’re not fully committed. It should go without saying, but don’t slag off former employers or colleagues.

A good recruiter will have ways and means of finding the disparities between what you say and how you behave. But even if you don’t slip up in interview, your true nature will eventually and inevitably become apparent, and you will have damaged your own personal brand.

If you apply the principle of being impeccable with your word you will be focused in your job search, because you will want to put the right actions and words into it.

You won’t scatter gun applications to every job out there, because you will want to put the right focus into the ones that you really want and in which you can perform well. In turn, people will see you as someone who behaves with integrity and follows through on what they say they will do.

The Second Principle

Don’t take anything done by others personally, because nothing others do is because of you. What others say and do is a projection of their own reality.

If you are met with a bad attitude or a rude response, remember that this is the other person’s reaction to their perceptions. Equally this applies if you are met with praise. For instance, you want to quit your job because you have found something better. You go to your current boss and they offer you the sun moon and stars for you to stay.

You start to feel pretty indispensable and think you can get a better deal. But what is really going on? Are you really that indispensable? Did the department and your role exist before you came along? Is it really that your current boss hates to have to recruit, and so will say anything right now to avoid the pain that they perceive in replacing you? In other words, it is likely to be much more about avoiding pain for themselves, than it is about holding on to you.

The Third Principle

Don’t make assumptions. That old cliché – when you assume you make an ass out of me and you. A cliché generally becomes a cliché because it is true.

Don’t assume that you are right or wrong for a job, or that a particular role is right or wrong for you – ask questions, find out as much as possible, be open to possibilities. Find the courage to ask questions and to express what you really want. Communicate with others as clearly as you can to avoid misunderstandings.

Also don’t make the assumption that if you want something you can’t have it – find out what the competencies are, and match these. Don’t assume you know what anyone else is thinking or feeling.

Recently I had a candidate say to me that she was thinking about changing her name, because she thought that the fact that she had an Asian name was thwarting her job search. She assumed that recruiters and prospective employers were making assumptions. While this is possible, it is a failure on both the recruiter and candidate’s side – who could ever assume the capabilities of a person based on their name alone?

You may have had what you thought to be a great interview, and that you have it in the bag. However, if you quell that excitement and remember to ask a question before you leave, such as is there are any concerns you have about me, or any other questions, you will find out what the interviewer is really thinking. You will be able to mitigate any doubts they have. Don’t make the assumption that the interviewer is just as excited about you as you are about the job.

The Fourth Principle

Always do your best. No matter how well or badly you perceive yourself to have performed in a given situation, believe that you did your best at that point in time. If you did well then great, no problem. But if you are walking away from the situation thinking “I messed that up” you are likely to beat yourself up about it.

In this instance the approach to take is that you did the best you could with the circumstances you were in, learn what held you back and prepare for this the next time. This will avoid you beating yourself up unnecessarily (and fruitlessly).

Where we feel guilty about actions we have taken, it normally does not help us to move on. Accept that you did the best you could at the time, and you will clear guilt away and be able to focus on how to work the situation to your advantage next time.

Maybe you’ve had a bad interview. You woke up late, you rushed out the door forgetting the notes you had prepared, you got stuck in traffic and instead of being the 15 minutes early you wanted to be you arrived right in time to walk into the interview, flustered and out of breath. Not a great first impression; and things got worse from there.

If you can walk away from that and take the lessons from it – preparation, ensuring you woke on time or left early enough to avoid traffic, and then let go of the disappointment you will be better able to prepare well the next time and not waste energy on guilt, embarrassment or self flagellation. Forgive yourself, and move forward from that situation, knowing that you did your best and that next time, you will do even better.

Apply the principles behind the four agreements as a starting point to your job search and see where else they work for you. Life is a constant challenge and trying a different approach when you get stuck is essential. These principles might not change your life overnight, but applying them is sure to at least change your outlook.

 

Cox Purtell Recruitment Agency Blog / Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide

Tags: Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Executive Assistant | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Melbourne | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney | Temporary Recruitment | Temps |

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