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  string(4764) "It might sound obvious, however you’d be surprised how many candidates march into a job interview with a potential employer without first taking a moment to consider what would be going through their heads if they were on the other side of the table – sitting in the shoes of the hiring manager.

If you’re the only candidate who does, you may just find you land that dream job you’ve been thinking about.

So let’s take moment to consider what might be going on between the ears of the hiring manager on the other side of the desk…

Does this person really want to work here or is this just one place on a hit list to fill a gap?

Does the candidate come in with an intimate understanding of an employers business and a list of reasons why this is the number one place in town where they want to come to work every day? Or do they show up and tell you abut themselves and how good they are?

As a hiring manager, candidates who start by talking about the reason they want to join the team rather than their own personal attributes are often far more attractive. You’ll get plenty of chance to toot your own horn when the questions about you start rolling in.

Does this person understand the gaps in their experience and have they given some thought to how they will address these gaps?

Rarely will someone join a team and already know everything about the role they are to fulfil; and if they did they are probably not the ideal candidate as they will not be growing and quickly become bored.

A great candidate therefore relishes the opportunity to call out their deficiencies and then lists the steps they will take to make up the ground.

Are you the candidate who hides their weaknesses, only to have them revealed in the last five minutes of the interview leaving a sour note to the end of the meeting?

Will this person be hard to manage?

Any employer/employee relationship is one which needs to be balanced however the first interview is not the place to bring out your list of demands.

“I would like a car park space, a mobile phone and gym membership – As my last employer offered this!”

Neither is it the place to complain… about anything. “They didn’t offer me the growth I wanted". Bring a confident attitude and a flexible mind and you’ll be miles ahead of the prima donna who struts in requiring a corner office, a view and a Herman Miller Eames executive chair.

Would I want to work with this person? Will they make me look good?

The most important questions of all. Do I want to work with this person, and will they make me look good? One must not forget that, from the perspective of the person on the other side of the desk the interview is actually about them, not you.

Help them understand that your biggest attribute will be to make them look like a rock star.

Is this person as good as they say they are? Are they exaggerating or are they telling the truth?

Tell the truth! Be honest and be respectful to your next potential employer. Hint: You will eventually be exposed from an exaggeration or a lie and guaranteed your references will check out, as ‘people know people’.

We live in a world where information is very, very easy to access, so don't state that you were the best performer at your last company when it is not the case. You will lose the job before you’ve even started.

We all want to impress, however allow others such as your referees be your biggest promoter.

So go forth and conquer! But before you do….sit for a moment in the shoes of the person who you will be facing.

Would you hire you?"
  ["post_title"]=>
  string(19) "Would You Hire You?"
  ["post_excerpt"]=>
  string(124) "Let's take moment to consider what might be going on between the ears of the hiring manager on the other side of the desk…"
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http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/blog/interviewers-block/"
  ["post_modified"]=>
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It might sound obvious, however you’d be surprised how many candidates march into a job interview with a potential employer without first taking a moment to consider what would be going through their heads if they were on the other side of the table – sitting in the shoes of the hiring manager.

If you’re the only candidate who does, you may just find you land that dream job you’ve been thinking about.

So let’s take moment to consider what might be going on between the ears of the hiring manager on the other side of the desk…

Does this person really want to work here or is this just one place on a hit list to fill a gap?

Does the candidate come in with an intimate understanding of an employers business and a list of reasons why this is the number one place in town where they want to come to work every day? Or do they show up and tell you abut themselves and how good they are?

As a hiring manager, candidates who start by talking about the reason they want to join the team rather than their own personal attributes are often far more attractive. You’ll get plenty of chance to toot your own horn when the questions about you start rolling in.

Does this person understand the gaps in their experience and have they given some thought to how they will address these gaps?

Rarely will someone join a team and already know everything about the role they are to fulfil; and if they did they are probably not the ideal candidate as they will not be growing and quickly become bored.

A great candidate therefore relishes the opportunity to call out their deficiencies and then lists the steps they will take to make up the ground.

Are you the candidate who hides their weaknesses, only to have them revealed in the last five minutes of the interview leaving a sour note to the end of the meeting?

Will this person be hard to manage?

Any employer/employee relationship is one which needs to be balanced however the first interview is not the place to bring out your list of demands.

“I would like a car park space, a mobile phone and gym membership – As my last employer offered this!”

Neither is it the place to complain… about anything. “They didn’t offer me the growth I wanted”. Bring a confident attitude and a flexible mind and you’ll be miles ahead of the prima donna who struts in requiring a corner office, a view and a Herman Miller Eames executive chair.

Would I want to work with this person? Will they make me look good?

The most important questions of all. Do I want to work with this person, and will they make me look good? One must not forget that, from the perspective of the person on the other side of the desk the interview is actually about them, not you.

Help them understand that your biggest attribute will be to make them look like a rock star.

Is this person as good as they say they are? Are they exaggerating or are they telling the truth?

Tell the truth! Be honest and be respectful to your next potential employer. Hint: You will eventually be exposed from an exaggeration or a lie and guaranteed your references will check out, as ‘people know people’.

We live in a world where information is very, very easy to access, so don’t state that you were the best performer at your last company when it is not the case. You will lose the job before you’ve even started.

We all want to impress, however allow others such as your referees be your biggest promoter.

So go forth and conquer! But before you do….sit for a moment in the shoes of the person who you will be facing.

Would you hire you?

Tags: Cox Purtell | Cox Purtell Blog | Hiring | Permanent Recruitment | Recruitment Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Adelaide | Recruitment Agency Melbourne | Recruitment Agency Sydney | Recruitment Melbourne | Recruitment Sydney | Temporary Recruitment |

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