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  int(42482)
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  ["post_date"]=>
  string(19) "2019-02-05 09:29:25"
  ["post_date_gmt"]=>
  string(19) "2019-02-04 23:29:25"
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  string(4895) "Today marks the first day of Lunar New Year, also known as Chinese New Year, and the first day of Year of the Pig.

Our lovely accountant, Weiming, is off celebrating with her family, but before she left she taught us a few things about Lunar New Year celebrations and how special it is!

Here’s what we’ve learned…
  1. Lunar New Year Celebrations go for TWO WEEKS!

Lunar New Year celebrations occur on different dates each year, as it follows the Lunar calendar rather than the Gregorian calendar - hence the name! Celebrations last for over two weeks and are filled with family, superstition, and (lots of) food. For many cultures, Lunar New Year celebrations incorporate thousands of years worth of traditions, so it’s no surprise that celebrations last for two weeks! In Australia, it’s often referred to as Chinese New Year, however people from countries such as Korea, Vietnam, Laos, and Singapore participate in these New Year Celebrations also.
  1. Preparations start long before New Year’s Eve

The New Year celebrations go for two weeks, however the festivities actually begin in the last week of the last lunar month. Before the new year festivities can begin, it’s crucial that a thorough spring clean is conducted. Sweeping, cleaning, and discarding things that aren’t used and needed is a way to say goodbye to the old year and create room for the new. This must be done before the New Year as it’s believed that cleaning in the first two weeks of the New Year will “sweep away” the good fortune of the new year! After being rid of the old, it’s common to go shopping and buy new things, which symbolises welcoming new things in the new year and getting ready for a new start.
  1. Last year was year of the Dog, this year is the year of the Pig

The Chinese zodiac consists of 12 zodiac animals, which are used to represent the year and can determine your fortune for the year; spouse compatibility; career fit; even the best time to give birth! 2019 is the Year of the Pig – the 12th zodiac animal. There are stories to accompany each zodiac animal and explain their position in the Chinese Zodiac. For example, one myth explains that the Jade Emperor decided the order for the Zodiac by the order in which they arrived at his party, and the Pig was late because he overslept. Another story says that a wolf destroyed Pig’s house and he had to rebuild before he could attend! In Chinese culture, the Pig is associated with wealth and good fortune due to their typically chubby faces and fat, full stomachs.
  1. Different days are celebrated in various ways

Each day of the two week celebrations bring their own unique traditions and celebrations. These will differ greatly depending on location (even in China, it differs by region!), however this is how our Accountant, Weiming will be celebrating:
  • Day 0: New Years Eve Is the day to send the old away. Families must stay together, prepare & enjoy dinner together, and eat dumplings at midnight.
  • Days 2 & 4: These days are to be spent with family to give greetings and gifts. Different days are dedicated to different relatives too, e.g. maternal grandparents, or parents-in-law, etc.
  • Day 5: This is the day for the Kitchen God, and the day is spent preparing food to please him. He will then report to the Jade Emperor in Heaven and give a report regarding the family.
  • Days 6 to 14: These days are spent in dedication and appeasement of various local gods and varies greatly by location.
  • Day 15: This is a very important day; the Lantern Festival. It’s a day and night of great celebration, including releasing lanterns; solving lantern riddles; eating yuanxiao (ball dumplings in soup), and enjoying the dragon & lion dancing.
  1. The celebrations are beautiful!

No matter where in the world it’s occurring, Lunar New Year celebrations are beautiful. Vivid colours, intricate decorations; family bonding; and amazing food! What’s not to love? Additionally, the City of Sydney has a number of great celebrations occurring over the Lunar New Year period, from cultural performances to workshops, to traditional tea ceremonies and food markets.   If you want to know more about how you can celebrate, learn more, or immerse yourself in a new culture, check out the City of Sydney website.  " ["post_title"]=> string(21) "Happy Lunar New Year!" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(20) "happy-lunar-new-year" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-02-05 09:29:25" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-02-04 23:29:25" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(37) "http://www.coxpurtell.com.au/?p=42482" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" }

Today marks the first day of Lunar New Year, also known as Chinese New Year, and the first day of Year of the Pig.

Our lovely accountant, Weiming, is off celebrating with her family, but before she left she taught us a few things about Lunar New Year celebrations and how special it is!

Here’s what we’ve learned…

  1. Lunar New Year Celebrations go for TWO WEEKS!

Lunar New Year celebrations occur on different dates each year, as it follows the Lunar calendar rather than the Gregorian calendar – hence the name! Celebrations last for over two weeks and are filled with family, superstition, and (lots of) food. For many cultures, Lunar New Year celebrations incorporate thousands of years worth of traditions, so it’s no surprise that celebrations last for two weeks!

In Australia, it’s often referred to as Chinese New Year, however people from countries such as Korea, Vietnam, Laos, and Singapore participate in these New Year Celebrations also.

  1. Preparations start long before New Year’s Eve

The New Year celebrations go for two weeks, however the festivities actually begin in the last week of the last lunar month. Before the new year festivities can begin, it’s crucial that a thorough spring clean is conducted.

Sweeping, cleaning, and discarding things that aren’t used and needed is a way to say goodbye to the old year and create room for the new. This must be done before the New Year as it’s believed that cleaning in the first two weeks of the New Year will “sweep away” the good fortune of the new year!

After being rid of the old, it’s common to go shopping and buy new things, which symbolises welcoming new things in the new year and getting ready for a new start.

  1. Last year was year of the Dog, this year is the year of the Pig

The Chinese zodiac consists of 12 zodiac animals, which are used to represent the year and can determine your fortune for the year; spouse compatibility; career fit; even the best time to give birth!

2019 is the Year of the Pig – the 12th zodiac animal. There are stories to accompany each zodiac animal and explain their position in the Chinese Zodiac. For example, one myth explains that the Jade Emperor decided the order for the Zodiac by the order in which they arrived at his party, and the Pig was late because he overslept. Another story says that a wolf destroyed Pig’s house and he had to rebuild before he could attend!

In Chinese culture, the Pig is associated with wealth and good fortune due to their typically chubby faces and fat, full stomachs.

  1. Different days are celebrated in various ways

Each day of the two week celebrations bring their own unique traditions and celebrations. These will differ greatly depending on location (even in China, it differs by region!), however this is how our Accountant, Weiming will be celebrating:

  • Day 0: New Years Eve Is the day to send the old away. Families must stay together, prepare & enjoy dinner together, and eat dumplings at midnight.
  • Days 2 & 4: These days are to be spent with family to give greetings and gifts. Different days are dedicated to different relatives too, e.g. maternal grandparents, or parents-in-law, etc.
  • Day 5: This is the day for the Kitchen God, and the day is spent preparing food to please him. He will then report to the Jade Emperor in Heaven and give a report regarding the family.
  • Days 6 to 14: These days are spent in dedication and appeasement of various local gods and varies greatly by location.
  • Day 15: This is a very important day; the Lantern Festival. It’s a day and night of great celebration, including releasing lanterns; solving lantern riddles; eating yuanxiao (ball dumplings in soup), and enjoying the dragon & lion dancing.
  1. The celebrations are beautiful!

No matter where in the world it’s occurring, Lunar New Year celebrations are beautiful. Vivid colours, intricate decorations; family bonding; and amazing food! What’s not to love?

Additionally, the City of Sydney has a number of great celebrations occurring over the Lunar New Year period, from cultural performances to workshops, to traditional tea ceremonies and food markets.

 

If you want to know more about how you can celebrate, learn more, or immerse yourself in a new culture, check out the City of Sydney website.

 

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